inheritance

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inheritance

 [in-her´ĭ-tans]
1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring; see also gene, deoxyribonucleic acid, and heredity.
intermediate inheritance inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of the two homozygotes.
maternal inheritance the transmission of characters that are dependent on peculiarities of the egg cytoplasm produced, in turn, by nuclear genes.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tans),
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

/in·her·i·tance/ (in-her´ĭ-tans)
1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring.

cytoplasmic inheritance  mitochondrial i.
dominant inheritance  see under gene.
extrachromosomal inheritance  mitochondrial i.
intermediate inheritance  inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of either homozygote.
maternal inheritance  mitochondrial i.
mitochondrial inheritance  the inheritance of traits controlled by genes on the DNA of mitochondria in the ooplasm; thus the genes are inherited entirely from the maternal side, segregate randomly at meiosis or mitosis, and are variably expressed.
recessive inheritance  see under gene.
sex-linked inheritance  see under gene.

inheritance

(ĭn-hĕr′ĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The action of inheriting something: the inheritance of property from a relative.
b. Something inherited or to be inherited: Her inheritance included a large estate.
2. Something regarded as a heritage: the cultural inheritance of Rome.
3. Biology
a. The process of genetic transmission of characteristics from parent or ancestor to offspring.
b. A characteristic so inherited.
c. The sum of genetically transmitted characteristics.

inheritance

[inher′itəns]
Etymology: L, in, within, hereditare, to inherit
1 the acquisition or expression of traits or conditions by transmission of genetic material from parents to offspring.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tăns)
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

1. The acquisition of a particular set of genes (GENOME) from the entire series of a person's forebears, by way of an equal number of genes from each parent.
2. The characteristics transmitted in this way.

inheritance

  1. the acquisition of characteristics by the transfer of genetic material from ancestor to descendant.
  2. the total of characters in the fertilized ovum.

inheritance

The acquisition of traits, characteristics and disorders from parents to their children by transmission of genetic information. Genes come in pairs: one originating from the father, the other from the mother. If an individual presents only the hereditary characteristics determined by one gene of the pair on an autosomal chromosome, that gene is called dominant. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal dominant inheritance. For instance, for a rare autosomal dominant disease, if one parent is affected, then on average about 50% of their children will also be affected, irrespective of the children's sex. Examples: Marfan's syndrome, congenital stationary night blindness, neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel-Lindau disease. If the individual does not present the hereditary characteristics unless both genes in a pair are of the same type, then the gene is called recessive. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal recessive inheritance. For a rare autosomal recessive disease, if a child is affected, then on average about 25% of their siblings will also be affected, irrespective of their sex. Examples: Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease, oculocutaneous albinism, galactokinase deficiency.Thirdly, inheritance may be controlled by genes on one of the sex chromosomes, most often the X chromosome. A recessive mutation on the single X chromosome carried by a male will cause a disease, whereas in the female, a recessive X chromosome mutation would have to be carried on both of her X chromosomes. Therefore in X-linked recessive inheritance (sex-linked recessive inheritance) males are affected more often than females. Examples: colour blindness, ocular albinism, choroideremia. A fourth type of inheritance considered in ophthalmic practice is mitochondrial (maternal) inheritance in which the inheritance of a trait encoded in the mitochondrial DNA is transmitted through the female line (mother to son or mother to daughter). Examples: Leber's hereditary optic atrophy; Kearns-Sayre syndrome. See acquired; chromosome; defective colour vision; gene; hereditary.
Table I5 Divisions of the infrared spectrum
IR-A (near)780-1400 nm
IR-B (middle)1400-3000 nm
IR-C (far)3000-1 000 000 nm

inheritance

1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring. See also gene, deoxyribonucleic acid and heredity.
Mendelian inheritance is the basis of all genetic practice, but it has limitations in explaining the small differences that occur in a range of offspring of similar and related matings. Galtonian genetics deals specifically with this problem and is better fitted as a tool in population genetics and in dealing with characters that are dependent on a number of chromosomal loci rather than on a single locus.

autosomal inheritance
controlled by genes located on autosomes.
intermediate inheritance
inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of either homozygote.
maternal inheritance
the transmission of characters that are dependent on peculiarities of the egg cytoplasm produced, in turn, by nuclear genes.
X-linked inheritance

Patient discussion about inheritance

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about inheritance
References in periodicals archive ?
I would argue that Marvell's elision of these inconvenient incidents - the disinheritance of Fairfax's ancestor and the subsequent legal wrangling among family members over control of the estate - indicates a related need to accompany the appearance of legitimate possession with one of natural and easy succession.
The ruin is a stratified site upon which is inscribed battles of succession that are exhumed under the threat of historical erasure, the disinheritance of Lovel that threatens the extinction of the ancient Glenallan line and the venerable House of Wardour.
This paper aims to examine the way the body functions in the text not only as an indicator of personal consciousness, but also as a metaphor for African people's cultural disinheritance created by the African diaspora.
40) In a double guise--as a site of possession in the supernatural sense, but also, as Sampson suggests despite himself, as a site that keeps alive a record of disinheritance and dispossession--in its guise as, in short, the literature classroom, the Gothic library haunts our practice still.
Maybe the fact that it's held in a bar in the middle of Broad Street, and the fact I've been threatened, only half-jokingly, with disinheritance if I bring home a Brummie lad, doesn't help.
The Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV and AIDS (KELIN), an NGO, has used an alternative dispute resolution mechanism to address disinheritance issues faced by widows and orphans affected by HIV and AIDS.
What Kate's case shows is both how easy and complicated it is to execute a deathbed disinheritance.
Without such a warning, without such an "inner check," the university-based priest-prophets can hardly hope to avoid what Panichas aptly called "a modern dreamworld with its unchecked ideologies, chimeras, fantasies, reveries, [and] utopias that plunge us deeper in a vacuum of disinheritance.
Gibson's reading allows us to understand how Joyce is at once the detached chronicler of Dublin urban life, the modernist who decodes what is both "familiar and foreign," while also simultaneously giving literary expression to the peculiarities of a general and shared twentieth-century concept of disinheritance and disconnection.
The policy commitment and implementation do not align with social expectations, no wonder this magnitude of collective social disinheritance and loss, which are permanent.
Discord and Disinheritance," Chapter nine, surveys a range of familial ties that were troubled or broken, divisions sometimes prompted by the contents of the will itself.
Dalgarno describes the coins in use at each important stage of his live and composes his self-portrait in such a way that the obscure circumstances (or ill-luck or destiny) that resulted in his disinheritance will be made evident to the reader.