disinfectant


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Related to disinfectant: antiseptic

disinfectant

 [dis″in-fek´tant]
1. freeing from infection or infection-producing organisms.
2. an agent that does this. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis'in-fek'tănt),
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.
2. An agent that possesses this property.

disinfectant

/dis·in·fec·tant/ (dis″-in-fek´tant)
1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that disinfects, particularly one used on inanimate objects.

disinfectant

(dĭs′ĭn-fĕk′tənt)
n.
An agent, such as heat, radiation, or a chemical, that destroys, neutralizes, or inhibits the growth of disease-carrying microorganisms.
adj.
Serving to disinfect.

disinfectant

[dis′infek′tənt]
a liquid chemical that can be applied to objects to eliminate many or all pathogenic microorganisms with the exception of bacterial spores. See also antiseptic.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth.
2. An agent that possesses the capacity to disinfect.

disinfectant

a chemical agent used for the DISINFECTION of inanimate objects.

disinfectant

agent that destroys microorganisms

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
Agent capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.

disinfectant (dis´infek´tənt),

n a chemical intended to destroy most pathogenic microorganisms. Does not cause sterilization.
disinfectant, alcohol,
n an unaccepted method of sterilization. Although ethanol and isopropanol both have cleansing properties when used on the skin, they are insufficient as sterilizers.
disinfectant, chlorine dioxide,
n a chemical disinfectant that can be used for 24 hours once it is activated. It can corrode some steel tools.
disinfectant holding solution,
n an antimicrobial liquid into which an object can be temporarily placed while awaiting sterilization.

disinfectant

1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that destroys infection-producing organisms. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minncare HD disinfectant was developed to address the need for a validated water system disinfectant that is both safe and effective.
The qualification should replicate the same disinfectant concentration and contact exposure time used in the facility.
If semi-critical items are not heat-tolerant (plastic or rubber items), they can be immersed in a high-level disinfectant for three to 10 hours to achieve sterilization.
Disinfect gloves with disinfectant or soap and water before taking them off.
Among industrial markets, growth will be led by food and beverage processing, where growth in food processing activity coupled with heightened awareness of the health risks and potential liability associated with foodborne pathogens will spur greater use of disinfectants.
The researchers found that adolescents, with 307 episodes of illness, were more than four times as likely as adults to be injured or made ill by workplace exposure to disinfectants.
Further, mycobacteria can grow on the organic compounds in metalworking fluid, including the paraffins, pine oils, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (18,19) and can degrade the disinfectant morpholine (20).
However, there have been major developments within the European Standards Organisation (CEN) that have resulted in new disinfectant test methods being published by the British Standards Institute.
But despite the rise in infections, the Environmental Protection Agency has failed to monitor the disinfectant industry effectively In 1990, the government's General Accounting Office (GAO) reported that the EPA had acknowledged that "as many as 20 percent of marketed disinfectants may be ineffective" -- and the EPA has done little to put a dent in that figure.
The disinfection process includes filtering, adding a primary disinfectant, and maintaining a residual disinfectant throughout the distribution system to guard against subsequent contamination or microorganism regrowth.
US dominated global antiseptic and disinfectant market in 2010, with a 41% share