disinfectant


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Related to disinfectant: antiseptic

disinfectant

 [dis″in-fek´tant]
1. freeing from infection or infection-producing organisms.
2. an agent that does this. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis'in-fek'tănt),
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.
2. An agent that possesses this property.

disinfectant

/dis·in·fec·tant/ (dis″-in-fek´tant)
1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that disinfects, particularly one used on inanimate objects.

disinfectant

(dĭs′ĭn-fĕk′tənt)
n.
An agent, such as heat, radiation, or a chemical, that destroys, neutralizes, or inhibits the growth of disease-carrying microorganisms.
adj.
Serving to disinfect.

disinfectant

[dis′infek′tənt]
a liquid chemical that can be applied to objects to eliminate many or all pathogenic microorganisms with the exception of bacterial spores. See also antiseptic.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth.
2. An agent that possesses the capacity to disinfect.

disinfectant

a chemical agent used for the DISINFECTION of inanimate objects.

disinfectant

agent that destroys microorganisms

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
Agent capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.

disinfectant (dis´infek´tənt),

n a chemical intended to destroy most pathogenic microorganisms. Does not cause sterilization.
disinfectant, alcohol,
n an unaccepted method of sterilization. Although ethanol and isopropanol both have cleansing properties when used on the skin, they are insufficient as sterilizers.
disinfectant, chlorine dioxide,
n a chemical disinfectant that can be used for 24 hours once it is activated. It can corrode some steel tools.
disinfectant holding solution,
n an antimicrobial liquid into which an object can be temporarily placed while awaiting sterilization.

disinfectant

1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that destroys infection-producing organisms. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly Better Medical Launches PURE Hard Surface Disinfectant II-27
5, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- This BCC Research report summarizes the development, innovations and market movements of antiseptics and disinfectants, and offers a view on their usage in diverse areas.
Growing healthcare expenditure will aid the growth of the Surface Disinfectant Market.
If semi-critical items are not heat-tolerant (plastic or rubber items), they can be immersed in a high-level disinfectant for three to 10 hours to achieve sterilization.
Spray dead rodents with disinfectant and then double-bag them along with all cleaning materials.
The researchers tracked episodes of worker illness and injury related to five classes of disinfectants: halogens including hypochlorites (bleach and its relatives), quaternary ammonium compounds (hard-surface cleaners that impede bacterial growth at high dilution), phenolic agents (including coal tar disinfectants such as Lysol), products containing pine oils (added more for their "clean" scent than their cleansing properties), and "unspecified" agents (where the identity of the specific disinfectant was not determined).
Mycobacteria are also quite resistant to agents used for surface and instrument disinfection, including quaternary ammonium compounds, phenolics, iodophors, and glutaraldehyde (16,22,23,36) and can degrade the disinfectant morpholine (20).
Legislation concerning the placing of biocides on the EU market (Council Directive 98/8/EC) will have an impact on the selection of disinfectants available to food processors, reports the Campden & Chorleywood Food Research Association (CCFRA).
The global antiseptic and disinfectant research report contains 134 pages of insightful market information, with forecast and historical data for the period 2009-2016.
This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Disinfectants in US$ Million by the following Delivery Systems: Aerosols, Non-Aerosols, Industrial & Institutional, Healthcare, and Consumer.
PURE Bioscience has formed a partnership with wipes manufacturer Rockline Industries for North American distribution of PURE's ready-to-use Powered by SDC disinfectant product and for the development and North American distribution of wipes products as well as new disinfectant, sanitizer and preservative products containing PURE's patented antimicrobial, silver dihydrogen citrate (SDC).
The Commercial Care Division of 3M has introduced the 3M[TM] TB Quat Disinfectant Ready-To-Use Cleaner, an EPA-registered intermediate-level disinfectant.