incentive

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in·cen·tive

(in-sen'tiv),
In experimental psychology, an object or goal of motivated behavior.
[LL. incentivus, provocative]

incentive

(ĭn-sĕn′tĭv)
Any stimulus that encourages a desired response. Incentives may be provided to patients (e.g., to ensure adherence to treatment plans), to practitioners (e.g., to improve productivity or job performance), or to students (e.g., to improve grades).

financial incentive

A cash payment made to a patient who achieves a health-related goal such as sustaining a weight loss over a 6-month period or maintaining abstinence from a toxic substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 18% of employers who reported not offering incentives or disincentives, 53% indicated the reason was that it was not part of their corporate culture and 47% are not sure it works.
Meanwhile, taking on more profitable work (which often causes man-hours to climb) is a disincentive for foundries trying to satisfy a MH/ton target.
Chris Lea, a director of Stoford Developments, which has completed projects at Binley Business Park, Manor House Drive in Coventry, and Spa Park, Leamington, said the tax was "a big disincentive to new development.
In addition, financial incentive and disincentive programs continue to grow in popularity, with 40 percent of companies offering them, compared with 29 percent in 1994.
A chain of recourse notes can be established between a taxpayer and a creditor outside of the circular transaction; the creditor has no disincentive to calling the loan in the event of default, theoretically establishing "at risk.
Would the unique treatment of goodwill charges in the income statement serve as a disincentive to separately recognizing identifiable intangible assets that are not afforded that same treatment?
Conversely, applicants have a disincentive to demonstrate any capacity to work because doing so may disqualify them for benefits.
Ironically, TSCA regulations provide a strong disincentive to the development of safer microbiologic alternatives for use in bioremediation.
Of course, insurers could change their compensation structures to eliminate this disincentive, but that will probably take some time and experience.
That's a substantial disincentive to learn one's genetic risks," Murray says.
The loss is not only the locality's, but because of the cascading effect of the disincentive, the entire Commonwealth's.
To evaluate the improvement in incentives associated with equilibrium pricing, we define a measure, called the disincentive index, of the extent to which a set of prices creates economic disincentives to efficient behavior.