disimpaction

dis·im·pac·tion

(dis'im-pak'shŭn),
1. Separation of impaction in a fractured bone.
2. Removal of feces, usually manually, in fecal impaction.

dis·im·pac·tion

(dis-im-pak'shŭn)
1. Separation of impaction in a fractured bone.
2. Removal of impacted feces, usually manually.

disimpaction

Separation by traction of the broken ends of a bone that have been driven into each other in a position of poor alignment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Motility agents should only be used after a rectal examination and disimpaction and not if obstruction is present.
This case illustrates that recognition of severe, chronic constipation should lead to interventions including disimpaction and aggressive medical management.
Management of reversible conditions that cause or contribute to urinary incontinence in elderly women Condition Management Excess fluid intake Reduction in intake of especially diuretic fluids (eg, caffeinated beverages) Urinary tract infection Antimicrobial therapy Atrophic vaginitis/ Oral or topical estrogen (estrogenic use is urethritis increasingly challenged) Stool impaction Disimpaction, stool softeners, bulk-forming agents, and laxatives if necessary, high-fiber intake, adequate mobility and fluid intake Metabolic (hyperglycemia, Better control of diabetes mellitus hypercalcemia) Therapy for hypercalcemia depends on underlying cause.
Treatment of fecal impaction include digital disimpaction, water enemas, and in some cases antibiotics.
As the 24-hour nurse appeared unwilling or unable to assist, I felt obliged to carry out a manual disimpaction.
It also provides a means for possible disimpaction if the distal esophagus and antrum can be examined and patency verified.
He was found to have pill impaction requiring mechanical disimpaction related to an esophageal web and pseudodiverticulosis.
After disimpaction of the bolus, a small hiatal hernia was evident (figure, B).
For hearing impairment, there was provision of amplifying devices and ear-wax disimpaction.
21,23) Disimpaction and cancellous grafting of the humeral head is best suited for defects less than three weeks old involving less than 45% of the articular surface, and is accomplished by creation of a cortical window opposite to the defect (usually on the lesser tuberosity), elevation of the impacted articular surface, cancellous grafting of the subchondral void, and buttressing of the graft using countersunk cancellous screws.
Children who are very constipated (faecal impaction) will require disimpaction (clearing of the bowel) before ongoing maintenance treatment can be started.
Disimpaction is a vital part of an effective treatment regime for children and young people with idiopathic constipation, and this includes those who may have been referred for further investigation following the recognition of red or amber flags but in whom no significant findings were found.