disenfranchise

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Related to disfranchisement: disenfranchisement

disenfranchise

verb To deprive of a right or entitlement.
References in periodicals archive ?
criminal justice policy, and one that may serve to reinforce all others over time, is the issue of felon disfranchisement, the temporary or permanent disqualification of voting rights for current and former felons.
Alabama's lawyer also urged the Court to confront disfranchisement head-on, instead of framing the case in narrow procedural or technical terms.
Because of centuries of systematic disfranchisement, for most blacks the dream of prosperity so closely linked with the idea of celebrity status is an ever-receding horizon.
These laws serve the same purpose as the nadir-era disfranchisement acts--poll tax, property legislation, and literacy tests--to drive African Americans out of the polity, to eliminate their capacity to use government to protect themselves from racist attacks.
For instance, Belton argues that because the United States government is too weak, hostile, or indifferent to protect blacks from disfranchisement and racial violence, "[t]he Negro must therefore fight to keep afloat a flag that can afford him no more protection than could a helpless baby" (p.
These trends reveal the makings of what may constitute a "National Security State"--the exercising of state power without democratic controls, checks and balances, a state where policing is employed to carry out the disfranchisement of its own citizens.
According to The Canon, this denial of remedy marked the case's place in history, and put the federal stamp of approval on the disfranchisement of blacks in the South.
In a show of "international solidarity," African American delegates passed a resol ution that pledged aid and support to anyone struggling to "free themselves from bondage, whether it is personal servitude or political disfranchisement.
In the oil rich Niger-delta, youths who have complained about years of exploitation, and their disfranchisement from the Nigerian state had declared that any elections in the area will be disrupted with extreme violence--a threat taken seriously, considering the antecedents.
And in the last, she insists, "Were [Child] living to-day, her trenchent [sic] pen would do us yeoman's service in the vexed question of disfranchisement and equality for the Afro-American" (454).
One is to suggest that there would have been a real difference in racial separation in the North from racial segregation in the South, the difference being that in the South the racial segregation was backed up by disfranchisement enforced by terror.
But there is no hint as to what obstacle there might have been during the first 133 years of the republic (to say nothing of the other nations, numbering no less than all of them in which there was any voting, in which such disfranchisement was also the case) to the remedying of so obvious an injustice.