disfluent


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dis·flu·ent

(dis-flū'ent),
Relating to disfluency.

dis·flu·ent

(dis-flū'ĕnt)
Relating to dysfluency.
References in periodicals archive ?
When information is presented in a disfluent format, people tend to modify, and rely less on, their existing beliefs.
Each root node is viewed as a separate phrase; attaching disfluent words to the root creates semantically incomplete phrases that are subsequently discarded.
In this paper we have argued that the problem of stuttering can usefully be viewed in these terms, as involving not merely the behavioral production of disfluent speech, but also the construction, across time, of a sense of self that is problem-saturated and resistant to change.
Even if Jack works hard practicing appropriate behavior, his new behavior may be disfluent and he may feel that he is not true to his "real self": his characteristic, rapid, automatic, effortless, context and stimulus-appropriate behavior (Fraley, 1998; Johnson & Layng, 1996).
A disfluent student reads slowly and laboriously, stopping often to sound out words and rereading sections to regain comprehension.
Exploring the physical behaviors that accompany a client's disfluent speech may also be valuable, as the client's self-awareness of concrete behaviors will be increased.
In contrast, the same person composed the following lengthier and more disfluent utterance when only permitted to speak:
The data below show examples of this seemingly disfluent production of polymorphemic words where there is a pause between the prefix and root.
We do know that almost everyone is disfluent on occasion and disfluency is frequently seen in preschool age children.
Comparing the disfluent speech of people who stutter to the fluent speech of nonstuttering2 individuals fosters an environment in which people who stutter are devalued.