disfiguring surgery

A term for surgery that significantly changes the appearance of a body region that is not generally covered by clothing—e.g., the face, hands and arms—or a region that is integral to a person’s body image—e.g., the breasts. Disfiguring surgery is undertaken for extensive cancer or to repair significant trauma; the term mutilating surgery generally refers to other—usually covered—body regions

disfiguring surgery

A popular term for surgery that mutilates, especially if it affects the face, hands and arms; the term mutilating surgery generally refers to other body regions
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The unconventional approach spared the young girl from a disfiguring surgery that is usually used to treat the infection.
2 One study demonstrated in many cases achieving free margins often involves disfiguring surgery.
Often, surgical resection with adequate safety margins can be achieved only by disfiguring surgery, if at all.
Osseointegrated dental implants are also used to rehabilitate patients whose external facial structures, such as noses, cheek bones or ears, are missing due to birth defects or disfiguring surgery or trauma.
Having less disfiguring surgery and the ability to deliver less chemotherapy based on the stage at diagnosis are for me a step forward.
Late diagnosis of oral cancer can lead to disfiguring surgery, and it causes around 1,800 deaths a year .
The aim, she said, is to create a noninvasive test that could diagnose head and neck cancer in its earliest stages, before prognosis is poor and available treatments are limited to disfiguring surgery and grueling regimens of chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
Left untreated, basal-cell carcinomas can invade deep tissue and require disfiguring surgery.
Peter successfully sued Dr Mairs and the medical centre, claiming he might not have needed disfiguring surgery if he had been sent to hospital earlier.
Those who do survive frequently undergo disfiguring surgery.
While our case and the case reported by Tsiodras et al (13) are rare and were characterized by somewhat extenuating circumstances, each represents a clear case of successful treatment of this invasive disease with relatively nontoxic medications that spared both patients radical, disfiguring surgery.
In an effort to reduce disfiguring surgery for what may be a benign pigmented lesion, he has experimented with shave biopsy to remove pigmented areas of the proximal matrix.