disengagement


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disengagement

 [dis″en-gāj´ment]
emergence of the fetus, or part thereof, from the vaginal canal.

dis·en·gage·ment

(dis'en-gāj'ment),
1. The act of setting free or extricating; in childbirth, the emergence of the head from the vulva.
2. Ascent of the presenting part from the pelvis after the inlet has been negotiated.
[Fr.]

disengagement

/dis·en·gage·ment/ (dis″en-gāj´ment) emergence of the fetus from the vaginal canal.

disengagement

[dis′engāj′mənt]
Etymology: Fr, disengager, to release from engagement
1 an obstetric manipulation in which the presenting part of the baby is dislodged from the maternal pelvis as part of an operative delivery. See also Kielland's rotation, version and extraction.
2 the release or detachment of oneself from other persons or responsibilities.
3 (in transactional family therapy) a role assumed by a nurse or other therapist in observing and restructuring intervention without becoming actively and directly involved in the problem.

disengagement

A generic UK term of art for the disassociation of an individual with the services (e.g., healthcare or social services), to which he/she is entitled.

dis·en·gage·ment

(dis-ĕn-gāj'mĕnt)
1. The act of setting free or extricating; in childbirth, the emergence of the head from the vulva.
2. Ascent of the presenting part from the pelvis after the inlet has been negotiated.
[Fr.]

disengagement

emergence of the fetus, or part thereof, from the vaginal canal.
References in periodicals archive ?
We examined whether moral disengagement mediated achievement goals and misbehaviors.
Disengagement is one of the coping strategies that might be used to deal with the burnout.
Autonomous motivation was positively correlated with prosocial behavior, whereas controlling motivation was positively correlated with moral disengagement and antisocial behavior.
In the literature, disengagement is largely discussed as the response to a threat to one's self-esteem or social identity, and refers to disengaging from a particular domain (Cheng & McCarthy, 2013; Leitner, Hehman, Deegan, & Jones, 2014) or a particular group in which one experiences negative stereotypes (Pagliaro, Alparone, Pacilli, & Mucchi-Faina, 2012).
Since a director's conduct rarely will rise to the level of a breach of fiduciary duty but can nevertheless be detrimental to the board, preventing director disengagement before it occurs is the best way to ensure that boards continue to operate effectively.
H2: Disengagement has a significant negative impact on in- role performance.
Christensen-Moore and Walsh concluded that identifying triggers for disengagement early on was possible in the right circumstances, for example where a culture of no blame was encouraged, where professional networks were strong and where managers were offering support for staff:
The national average for 2013-2014 was 18% active disengagement.
If there are supplier personnel whom the customer believes are critical to the success of disengagement services, the supplier should retain those employees on the customer's engagement for the required duration.
The statement given by chief minister that he had ordered for disengagement of police is wrong.
Since 1974 when the Israel-Syria conflict intensified, UNDOF was established following the agreed disengagement of the Israel and Syrian forces in Golan Heights.
She however reached a similar conviction with respect to the disengagement.