disenfranchisement


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dis·en·fran·chise·ment

(dis'ĕn-fran'chīz-mĕnt)
Denial of a person's rights (e.g., the right to health care).

disenfranchisement

(dis?en-fran?chiz'ment) [ ¹dis- + enfranchisement]
Deprivation of a person's legal rights or privileges, such as the right to citizenship, the right to vote, and the right to participate in activities or options available to others.
See: enfranchisement
References in periodicals archive ?
While some smaller communities within the colonies, like Plymouth, imposed permanent disenfranchisement, few required it for the entire colony.
In a region of the country known for its progressive views toward felony voting rights, (8) Washington's felony disenfranchisement rate is remarkably one-and-a-half times the national average and seven times as high as neighboring Oregon.
Felon disenfranchisement, she continued, sets up a dynamic in which enfranchised citizens prevail over those who are disenfranchised due to a criminal conviction, further threatening the farter's already disadvantaged place in society.
The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) Elections Reform database was used to identify disenfranchisement policies enacted by state legislatures from 2001-2010.
I hope that this report is viewed as a constructive contribution to the discussion of ex-felon disenfranchisement in Tennessee and how it might be made less restrictive in its application, and by removing unnecessary barriers to restoring one's voting rights.
I hope member states will be ready to address these very concrete concerns, because disenfranchisement is a big deal for the individuals concerned," she pointed out.
Meanwhile, on April 23, Egypt's Parliament enacted the Political Disenfranchisement Law, which stipulated that individuals who served in top positions during the last ten years of Hosni Mubarak's rule would be ineligible to enter the presidential race or run for public office for the next five years.
I think the biggest issue was a sense of disenfranchisement and their sense of not being part of their own and that is what we discussed.
Add to that the likelihood many voters, including students, will have their rights challenged at precincts on Election Day, and there will be a mixture for long lines and disenfranchisement that will be nearly impossible to correct before election results are tabulated.
It would appear to amount to disenfranchisement of the taxpayers and voters in the former district councils.
While the NPV proposal creates vexing problems of effective oversight, widespread potential for cheating and time-consuming appeals, it fails to achieve the primary rationale offered for it -- fixing the Electoral College's disenfranchisement of voters in "safe" states.