disenfranchise


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disenfranchise

verb To deprive of a right or entitlement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Democrats said the Republicans were trying to disenfranchise voters.
That may increase the enfranchisement of some, but since all federal handouts must come from someone else, it disenfranchises others.
I don't think it's designed to disenfranchise African Americans, but that's been the impact," he says.
By seeking to disenfranchise Arab Americans, Lazio has shown that he may not be fit to serve in the United States Senate.
This will include removing the burdens that disenfranchise Ohio voters and, as a practical matter, make the ability to vote vary widely from county to county.
Also Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal judge to postpone the recall election, arguing that it will take until March to replace punch-card voting machines the group claims would disenfranchise thousands of Californians.
About half the errors could disenfranchise voters because registrations or changes of address were simply not entered at this time, or because of "fatal" errors.
We do not believe that Hollinger International should be allowed to disenfranchise shareholders and deny them their fundamental legal rights.
Disenfranchised groups can make a huge difference by ending our support of the status-quo, two-party system that disenfranchises us and the candidates who betray us.
The three inmates - a drug smuggler, an arsonist and a man serving life for manslaughter - are seeking a declaration that the 1983 Representation of the People Act, which disenfranchises them, is incompatible with their rights under the European Convention on Human Rights, as set out in the 1998 Human Rights Act.