disempowerment


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disempowerment

The forcible denial by one or more persons in a position of power over the rights and choices of another person or group.

Examples
Withholding from a patient relevant information and/or excluding that person from decision-making about emotional, physical, intellectual, social, economic or cultural aspects of his/her own life.
References in periodicals archive ?
HAVING READ the letters in recent issues of Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand relating to "curing the cancer of horizontal violence", I would like to comment on the notion of horizontal violence and disempowerment within our educational settings.
How different from the UK, where our paternalistic approach to dying - 'better leave it to doctors to decide what's best' - adds to the disempowerment already felt by people who are terminally ill.
The result, as Geschiere notes is "that modern transformations have tended to corrupt notions on witchcraft so that it risks degenerating into a discourse on power and especially on disempowerment.
The consequences of that decision in impoverished public discourse and a widespread sense of disempowerment are clear.
I saw the image of the new Soweto in Renee Green's Vogue par Nelson Mandela (Taste Venue), 1994, as well as in her unfinished video installation, Chasing Lusethenia, in which subjects are shown discussing censorship, restrictions on people's movements, and disempowerment.
She said students suffered from depression, loss of confidence and feelings of disempowerment.
5 (ANI): Vice President Mohammad Hamid Ansari on Saturday said that education reform is the need of the hour, as the teachers in the country are facing professional disempowerment.
Her hostility toward the white men she works with has more to do with her reaction to her disempowerment as a black woman artist than with the songs per se, although the record becomes the site of their conflict:
Experts fear enforcement of such laws, which could lead to disempowerment and isolation of the concerned user.
As seen from recent tragic stories in hospitals and other institutional settings, this image serves only to increase isolation, disempowerment and victimisation.
Compared with these various expressions of voter disempowerment, the other suggested reasons for not voting - such as the restricted opening hours and accessibility of polling stations - attracted only minority agreement.
Participants who were primed for power had much higher self-esteem scores and a much greater illusion of control than those primed for disempowerment.