stimulus

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Related to discriminative stimulus: Negative reinforcement, operant conditioning, stimulus generalization, eliciting stimulus

stimulus

 [stim´u-lus] (L.)
any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
conditioned stimulus a stimulus that acquires the ability to evoke a given response by repeatedly being linked with another stimulus that naturally evokes that response; see also conditioning.
depolarizing stimulus a stimulus that lowers the resting potential, making the inside of a fiber less negative. In cardiac fibers this means bringing the resting potential from −90 mV to −70 mV.
discriminative stimulus a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a given type of behavior; the subject must discriminate between closely related stimuli and respond positively only with this particular stimulus.
eliciting stimulus any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
threshold stimulus a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus any stimulus that naturally evokes a specific response; see also conditioning.

stim·u·lus

, pl.

stim·u·li

(stim'yū-lŭs, -lī),
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action upon any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

/stim·u·lus/ (stim´u-lus) pl. stim´uli   [L.] any agent, act, or influence which produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
adequate stimulus  a stimulus of the specific form of energy to which a given receptor is sensitive.
aversive stimulus  one which, when applied following the occurrence of a response, decreases the strength of that response on later occurrences.
conditioned stimulus  a stimulus that acquires the capacity to evoke a particular response on repeated pairing with another stimulus naturally capable of eliciting the response.
discriminative stimulus  a stimulus, associated with reinforcement, that exerts control over a particular form of behavior; the subject discriminates between closely related stimuli and responds positively only in the presence of that stimulus.
eliciting stimulus  any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
heterologous stimulus  one that produces an effect or sensation when applied to any part of a nerve tract.
homologous stimulus  adequate s.
threshold stimulus  a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus  any stimulus naturally capable of eliciting a specific response.

stimulus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stimu·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.

stimulus

[stim′yələs] pl. stimuli
Etymology: L, stimulare, to incite
anything that excites or incites an organism or part to function, become active, or respond. stimulate, v.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

Anything that causes a response, either in an excitable tissue or in an organism.

stimulus

any detectable change in the environment (internal or external) of an organism which is capable of activating a receptor and thus producing a RESPONSE in the whole organism or parts of it.

Stimulus

A factor capable of eliciting a response in a nerve.
Mentioned in: Pain, Pain Management

stimulus

that which evokes a reaction in excitable tissues

stimulus 

Any agent or environmental change that provokes a response. Plural: stimuli. See action potential.
adequate stimulus A stimulus of sufficient intensity and of appropriate nature to provoke a response in a given receptor. Visible light is the adequate stimulus for the eye, but pressure on the eye that may nevertheless produce a response (called a phosphene) is an inadequate stimulus.
inadequate stimulus 
See adequate stimulus.
liminal stimulus A stimulus of an intensity such that it just provokes a response that is at threshold. Syn. threshold stimulus.
threshold stimulus See liminal stimulus.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus (stim´ūlus),

n a chemical, thermal, electrical, or mechanical influence that changes the normal environment of irritable tissue and creates an impulse.

stimulus

pl. stimuli [L.] any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.

conditioned stimulus
a neutral object or event that is psychologically related to a naturally stimulating object or event and which causes a conditioned response. See also conditioning.
discriminative stimulus
a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a particular form of behavior; the subject discriminates between closely related stimuli and responds positively only in the presence of that stimulus.
eliciting stimulus
any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, which elicits a response.
stimulus generalization
in learning by animals stimuli tend to be grouped together, the reactions lacking the discrimination of the higher mammals.
stimulus response coupling
coupling of the neural or endocrine stimulus to the cellular response.
structured stimulus
a well-organized and unambiguous stimulus, the perception of which is influenced to a greater extent by the characteristics of the stimulus than by those of the perceiver.
threshold stimulus
a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus
any stimulus that is capable of eliciting an unconditioned response. See also conditioning.
unstructured stimulus
an unclear or ambiguous stimulus, the perception of which is influenced to a greater extent by the characteristics of the perceiver than by those of the stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subtl differences in the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine and GBR-12909 Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Pyschiatry, 25, 639-659.
Extinction of the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine with a devalued reinforcer: recovery following revaluation.
For example, Michael argued (and see also McDevitt & Fantino, 1993) that electric shock does not function as an operant discriminative stimulus for rats' lever pressing but rather (as a stimulus) establishes the operation by which shock removal functions as an operant negative reinforcer.
If accuracy of the schedule discrimination was deteriorated when the FI value was changed, it would be highly plausible that time spent during the sample schedule link functioned as a discriminative stimulus of choices of the comparison choice link.
Unfortunately the hand movement (with the original therapist) became the discriminative stimulus for touching his nose.
The material is written for medicinal chemists and neuroscientists interested in the neurochemical mechanisms that underlie the discriminative stimulus properties of drugs.
Skinner classified VBs on the basis of motivational variables, discriminative stimulus control, and other VBs (that cause additional VBs).
With a discriminative stimulus present, a particular type of behavior, either questionable or acceptable, must have been followed by reinforcement relevant to some particular MO which was in effect at the time (Michael, 2004).
Unlike a tact response, which is controlled by a discriminative stimulus, a mand is controlled by an establishing or motivating operation (Laraway et al.
Discriminative stimulus effects of mu and kappa opioids in the pigeon: analysis of the effects of full and partial mu and kappa agonists.
On the other hand, an odor may serve as a discriminative stimulus rather than a conditioned stimulus.