discrimination

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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
In making a vocational choice, lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons may cope with perceptions of potential discrimination through vocational choice strategies.
Because self-employment and job tracking may not always be viable or desirable options, many lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons risk facing potential discrimination in their career decisions.
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons may also use various strategies to cope with potential or encountered discrimination when applying for a job or after being employed.
Such invisibility provides a context in which lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons may deal with potential discrimination through identity management--controlling disclosure of information about one's sexual orientation.
On the basis of an integration of strategies discussed in the limited literature, four discrimination management strategies are suggested in the present model of coping strategies: (a) quitting, (b) silence, (c) social support, and (d) confrontation.
These four discrimination management strategies follow a progressive order from refusing to face the issue to addressing the problem directly.
The dimension of perceived versus real discrimination is the reality factor.
The amount of risk a person is willing to take depends on a number of factors, such as potential for discrimination, the person's sexual identity development, the relative importance between sexual orientation and other considerations, and self-efficacy of coping with discrimination.
For clients who need assistance in dealing with potential discrimination when applying for a job or after being employed, counselors can discuss the pros and cons of each identity management strategy.
The pros and cons of each discrimination management strategy should be explored, preferably before the occurrence of discrimination so that clients are prepared when situations arise.