discrimination


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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
Source: Huffington Post Report "Perceived Age Discrimination Worse For Health Than Perceived Racism And Sexism, Study Finds"
If you cannot solve the problem using a grievance procedure or by involving your manager, a trade union or advice agency, a claim for sex discrimination, sexual harassment, or unfair dismissal if you have been dismissed, can be made to an Employment Tribunal.
The case ignited criticism because of the size of the proposed settlement -- it would have been the largest employee payout in LAFD history -- and the charge of racial discrimination leveled by Pierce, the only black firefighter assigned to Station 5 in Westchester.
The damages in such cases would not be excludable under section 104(a)(2) nor would they be considered discrimination or employment-related under section 62(a)(20).
A Hindu could not claim discrimination for not being hired to teach a catechism class.
During these four decades, a second generation of discrimination has emerged which serves to abridge or deny minorities their equal voting rights.
1998: President Bill Clinton issues Executive Order 13087, banning antigay discrimination in federal civilian employment.
Becker first made this point in his 1957 book The Economics of Discrimination, when he cited data showing that work force integration appeared to be lower in closely regulated industries than in less-regulated ones.
In Atlanta, for example, the commission filed no racial discrimination lawsuits in 2004 and only one was filed in Birmingham, Alabama.
These programs can and have succeeded without Congress forcing the abandonment of our nation's commitment to end religious discrimination.
Second-degree price discrimination entails a price-maker using more than one price, in selling its product (ppm) or hiring labor (rpm).