disconfirmation

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disconfirmation

[diskon′fərmā′shən]
a dysfunctional communication that negates, discounts, or ignores information received from another person.
References in periodicals archive ?
So instead of searching for confirmatory evidence, try to disconfirm your initial suspicions by actively seeking out and considering contradictory information.
Especially, Harris (1991) argued that more study is needed to find an answer to the question about when perceivers will confirm or disconfirm their negative expectations about the target.
The impetus to explore new perspectives and attitudes and to learn new behaviors always begins with this type of confrontation with information that disconfirms assumptions, expectations, or self-appraisal (Lewin, 1951; Schein, 1995).
Causal linkages and causal processes are specified by theories, and researchers' results--including results from correlational studies--either support or disconfirm the causal linkages or predictions specified in theories (see Asher, 1983, and Pedhazur, 1997, for an informed discussion of causality with correlational research).
bias is the tendency to seek to confirm, rather than disconfirm, any
In Schein's view, all forms of learning and change start with some form of dissatisfaction or frustration generated by data that disconfirm our expectations or hopes.
Again, these procedures have been outlined previously but involve situations where a child is asked to attend school under certain conditions to confirm or disconfirm a given functional hypothesis.
Consolatore may disagree, but I doubt that his opinions on this topic derive from the findings of any social science, sophisticated or otherwise: there is no social science that could even in principle confirm or disconfirm predictions about "what significant numbers of people would freely come to believe if they were presented with good arguments and were free to believe what they wished.
Findings of any one study may add to, confirm, disconfirm, or extend findings from other studies.
And for myself at least, conversations with theologians from various generations in the Catholic Theological Society of America and the College Theology Society confirm this conventional wisdom about young theologians more than they disconfirm it.
The two-step approach that Verdonk advocates should be clear by now: an impressionistic discussion of the literary effect of the text is followed by a detailed analysis of stylistic features which either confirm or disconfirm this general impression.