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dis·charge (DC),

1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.


/dis·charge/ (dis-chahrj´)
1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. matter or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.
4. release from a hospital or other course of care.
5. the passing of an action potential through a neuron, axon, or muscle fibers.

myokymic discharge  patterns of grouped or repetitive discharges of motor unit action potentials sometimes seen in myokymia.
myotonic discharge  high frequency repetitive discharges seen in myotonia and evoked by insertion of a needle electrode, percussion of a muscle, or stimulation of a muscle or its motor nerve.
periodic lateralized epileptiform discharge  (PLED) a pattern of repetitive paroxysmal slow or sharp waves seen on an electroencephalogram from just one side of the brain.


1. To emit a substance, as by excretion or secretion.
2. To release a patient from custody or care.
3. To generate an electrical impulse. Used of a neuron.
n. (dĭs′chärj′, dĭs-chärj′)
1. The act of releasing, emitting, or secreting.
2. A substance that is excreted or secreted.
3. The generation of an electrical impulse by a neuron.

discharge (d/c)

Etymology: OFr, deschargier, to expel
1 v, to release a substance or object. See also evacuate, excrete, secrete.
2 v, to release a patient from a hospital.
3 v, to release an electric charge, which may be manifested by a spark or surge of electricity, from a storage battery, condenser, or other source.
4 v, to release a burst of energy from or through a neuron.
5 n, also called affective discharge, (in psychology) a release of emotions, often accompanied by a wide range of voluntary and involuntary reflexes, weeping, rage, or other emotional displays.
6 n, a substance or object discharged.
7 n, the flow of a secretion or an excretion.


noun Any material released in effluents, generally of human origin; often organic or toxic waste.
verb A generic term for the release of materials (e.g., radioactive, biohazardous waste) and sundry anthropogenic detritus in effluents to the air, water, or sanitary facilities.
Managed care
verb To formally terminate a person’s care in and release them from a hospital or healthcare facility.

noun A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice.
verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

noun A term defined in the UK for the formal end of an episode of care.
Types of discharge
Day-case discharge, day-patient discharge, inpatient discharge, outpatient discharge.

(1) To formally end an episode of care.
(2) To formally end surveillance of a patient who was previously diagnosed with and treated for a condition, and who no longer requires surveillance.

See Menstrual discharge.
A stoma’s output.


Managed care verb (pron. dis charj´) To formally terminate a person's care in, and releasing from, a hospital or health care facility. See Complex repetitive discharge. Cf Admit Medtalk. noun (pron. dis´ charj) A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice. See Autogenic discharge, Nipple discharge, Prune juice discharge, Vaginal discharge verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.


(DC) (dis'chahrj)
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.


An abnormal outflow of body fluid, most commonly of pus mixed with normal secretions, or of normal secretions in abnormal amount. Discharge may occur from any body orifice or from a wound.


neurone activation


free exudate


That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.


v 1. to release; liberate; annul; unburden. To cancel a contract; to make an agreement or contract null and void.
n 2. a substance that exudes from an opening.
discharge, purulent,
discharge summary,
n the clinical notes written by the discharging physician or dental professional at the time of releasing a patient from the hospital or clinic, outlining the course of treatment, the status at release, and the postdischarge expectations and instructions.


1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. material or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.

ocular discharge
a sign of conjunctivitis; green or yellow discharge is indicative of cellular content and inflammatory response.

Patient discussion about discharge

Q. is there cause for alarm if i have a white thick discharge?

A. Hello, ruffdee, if the discharge is white, and NOT causing any itchy feeling, burn sensation, and not smelly, it probably still is in normal range.
But once you feel itchy, burning, its color turns yellowish or greenish, and it has bad smell, it might be a sign for an infection, and it is recommended then you to find a doctor to get the specific therapy to cure the infection.
"Stay healthy always.."

Q. if you've had rough sex can bleeding accur a day or two later and have a smelly discharge?

A. it is very possible to happen like that. a rough sex will most likely cause trauma in the mucosa (either it is vaginal mucosa or anal mucosa), and the bleeding can happen even after a day or two.
if you're experiencing smelly discharge, be aware of the possibility of genital infection, that's why I'll recommend you to go to a doctor to get checked, and then get the specific therapy for that.

if it is happened that you're getting genital infection, you would probably inform your sex-partner and encourage your partner to seek the same medical advice.

Stay healthy always...

More discussions about discharge
References in periodicals archive ?
The report estimates that, each year, more than 400,000 patients are discharged from hospital between 11pm and 6am - many of whom could be elderly or vulnerable patients with inadequate care and support.
Sir Bruce Keogh, medical director of the NHS, said: "I am concerned to hear that some patients may be being discharged unnecessarily late.
In the sample, 19% of patients failed to meet the DASAIM oxygen saturation discharge criteria and were discharged by anesthesiologists.
We found that the risk-adjusted mortality for patients discharged from ICU between 1800 and 0600 hours was higher than the population median (Figures 1 and 2) and this time interval was chosen to represent "after-hours".
And long before then, who will listen to their cries for help, or monitor what acts they commit--before they are triaged, discharged, and hung out to dry?
The patient groups that can be discharged by nurses are those on the lower end of the care continuum--"those with a predictable outcome and an uneventful recovery," Brophy said.
Approximately all of the equipment discharged during this mission was unfamiliar to most members of the 950th.
2 Number of full Army brigades that could be filled by already-trained, discharged gay and lesbian soldiers
1502-19T provides that an excess loss account attributable to DM stock must be included in income only to the extent that any amount discharged is excluded from gross income or is not treated as tax-exempt income (e.
She was discharged after appropriate management, and she had no further complaints.
Long term care facilities seeking to discharge a resident against his or her wishes often find themselves caught between the Scylla of a resident's legal right not to be discharged and the Charybdis of the rights of other residents and staff.
The truth is, we have significantly reduced the levels of toxic substances discharged by mills.