dirofilariasis


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Related to dirofilariasis: Dirofilaria repens

dirofilariasis

 [di″ro-fil″ah-ri´ah-sis]
infection with nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria; it is common in dogs and occasionally seen in humans, causing symptoms such as coughing, chest pain, and sometimes hemoptysis.

di·ro·fil·a·ri·a·sis

(di'rō-fil-ă-rī'ă-sis),
Infection of animals and, rarely, humans with nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria; cats are an atypical host and are susceptible to very samll worm burdens, even a few worms may lead to sudden death. In dogs, the definitive hosts, clinical signs include dyspnea, cough, reduced exercise tolerance, and weight loss. In cats, sudden death, vomition, and less commonly, a syndrome resembling asthma may occur. Microfilariae circulate in the bloodstream where they are picked up by mosquito vectors; death of the adult worms during treatment may release antigens in the bloodstream, which can lead to serious side effects including anaphylaxis, expecially in cats. Human infection is typically subclinical, with development of small pulmonary nodules that are often only picked up when they are confused with small tumors on X-ray.

dirofilariasis

/di·ro·fil·a·ri·a·sis/ (-fil″ah-ri´ah-sis) infection with nematodes of genus Dirofilaria, common in dogs but rare in humans.

dirofilariasis

[dī′rōfil′ərī′əsis]
a human infestation of the dog heartworm, Dirofilaria immitis, and the closely related D. (Nochtiella) repens, both of which may be transmitted through the bite of any of several species of mosquitoes. The filaria migrate through the bloodstream to the lung, producing pulmonary nodules and causing chest pain, coughing, and hemoptysis. The disease is rare among humans, but some species have been found to infect subcutaneous tissue and the eyes. Human disease is independent of dog ownership. Humans are deadend hosts for the parasites. Also called zoonotic filariasis.

dirofilariasis

infection with nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria. Includes subcutaneous swellings. See also heartworm disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria (Nochtiella) repens: an update of world literature from 1995 to 2000.
The immature worms found in human pulmonary dirofilariasis are characterized by diameters ranging from 100 to 350 [micro]m, presence of a thick laminated cuticle, inwardly projecting lateral cuticular chords, and abundant somatic muscle.
Diagnosis of pulmonary dirofilariasis has rarely been made prior to surgical resection.
nodules are benign, their detection may raise suspicion for a malignant tumor; thus, differential diagnosis is the key point in the management of human dirofilariasis (4).
Consequently, human ocular dirofilariasis will probably be found with increasing frequency in the future.
immitis nematodes are the most common species causing dirofilariasis in temperate and tropical areas.
Thus, incidence of human dirofilariasis is also expected to increase, although many asymptomatic infections are not diagnosed.
repens are the main causes of human dirofilariasis in the Americas (4,6) and Old World (2,5), respectively.
Twenty-eight cases of human dirofilariasis in the Old World attributed to D.
Dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens in Italy, an emergent zoonosis: report of 60 new cases.
Zoonotic filariasis in the Arabian Peninsula: autochthonous onchocerciasis and dirofilariasis.
We report 14 cases of human subcutaneous dirofilariasis caused by Dirofilaria repens, diagnosed from February 2003 through July 2004, in patients from Rostov-on-Don, Russia.