direct-to-consumer advertising


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

direct-to-consumer advertising

Drug industry The use of mass media–eg, TV, magazines, newspapers, to publicly promote drugs, medical devices or other products which, by law, require a prescription, which targets consumers, with the intent of having a Pt request the product by name. See Advertising. Cf 'Yellow' professionalism.

direct-to-consumer advertising

(dĭ-rĕkt′ too kŏn-soo′mĕr ăd′vĕr-tī″zĭng)
The marketing and sales of drugs, diagnostic or therapeutic services, and other medically related products or services by their owner or manufacturer to the general public by means of television, radio, the Internet, and direct mail. The most commonly advertised drugs are medications for allergies, arthritis, depression, erectile dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, and high blood pressure.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs on physician visits and drug requests: Empirical findings and public policy implications.
2006) GAO-07-54 Prescription Drugs: Improvements Needed in FDA's Oversight of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising.
The same NEJM study cited above mentioned that direct-to-consumer advertising leads to medication overuse.
Physicians report on patient encounters involving direct-to-consumer advertising.
Soumerai and his colleagues studied Canadians because although direct-to-consumer advertising is illegal in Canada, English speakers close to the border are ex- posed to U.
What's more, "real spending on direct-to-consumer advertising increased by 330 percent from 1996 to 2005.
As a major cost driver, direct-to-consumer advertising is expected to have a strong negative effect on employee health benefits plans, as well as more generally affecting the sustainability of publicly funded health-care services.
Comments from other manufacturers indicate that they are not entirely convinced that direct-to-consumer advertising is right for them.
In a recent analysis of TV direct-to-consumer advertising, researchers found that most ads (82%) made factual claims and rational arguments for a particular product, but very few described causes, risk factors, or prevalence of conditions treated by the drugs.
But, they concluded, direct-to-consumer advertising "often presents best-case scenarios that can distort and inflate consumers' expectations about what prescription drugs can accomplish.
Drug companies need more federal oversight when it comes to direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs, according to a recent U.
According to Caremark, the product pipeline for specialty drugs is flourishing, but their growing use is also being fueled by expanding applications of established products as well as increased promotion of the drugs through direct-to-consumer advertising.