direct patient contact

direct patient contact

A term for direct (face-to-face) care between a healthcare professional and a patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hospital staff and family caregivers can acquire infections through direct patient contact or contaminated fomites (18,19).
Uptake by NHS staff with direct patient contact increased to 52% and exceeded the 50% target for Wales for the first time.
I rarely had direct patient contact, but I had a very important part to play in ensuring those nurses working in my teams were in the best position to provide a high standard of patient care and, therefore, achieve the best outcomes for our patient population.
It's perfect for those who are detail-oriented and those who want to have a job in health care, but with less direct patient contact than, say, a nurse.
For this position, the professional liability (malpractice) insurance requirement is waived, as the contract involves no direct patient contact
This series is Body Floating direct patient contact rated, with Class I and II inputs, and is certified to UL/cUL/EN60601-l 3rd Edition.
We have also put together some FAQs for non-NMC line managers and those staff who do not have direct patient contact.
The purpose of this study is to determine if HSLs with direct patient contact experience symptoms of STS from their interactions and to explore the potential for future research in the population.
The agency also proposes to cover prolonged service in the office or other outpatient setting requiring direct patient contact beyond the usual service (99354 and 99355), and the HCPCS codes G0438 (annual wellness visit; includes a personalized prevention plan of service, initial visit), and G0439, the subsequent annual wellness visit.
Devin Nunes (R-other outpatient setting requiring direct patient contact beyond the usual service (99354 and 99355), and the HCPCS codes G0438 (annual wellness visit; includes a personalized prevention plan of service, initial visit), and G0439, the subsequent annual wellness visit.
Academic physicians who spent less than 20 percent of their time in their passionate work--research, direct patient contact, education--experienced a burnout rate of more than so percent, significantly higher than colleagues who spent more time in work that was meaningful to them.

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