direct Coombs test

di·rect Coombs test

(kūmz), Avoid the incorrect forms Coomb and Coomb's.
a test for detecting sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia: the patient's erythrocytes are washed with saline to remove serum and unattached antibody protein, then incubated with Coombs anti-human globulin (usually serum from a rabbit or goat previously immunized with human globulin); after incubation, the system is centrifuged and examined for agglutination, which indicates the presence of so-called incomplete or univalent antibodies on the surface of the erythrocytes.

direct Coombs test

See Antiglobulin test.

di·rect Coombs test

(dĭr-ekt kūmz test)
Assessment to detect sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia.

Coombs,

Robin R.A., English veterinarian and immunologist, 1921–.
Coombs serum - serum from a rabbit or other animal previously immunized with purified human globulin to prepare antibodies directed against IgG and complement. Synonym(s): antihuman globulin
Coombs test - a test for antibodies, the so-called antihuman globulin test, using either the direct or indirect Coombs tests. Synonym(s): antiglobulin test
direct Coombs test - a test for detecting sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia.
Gell and Coombs reaction - see under Gell
indirect Coombs test - a test routinely performed in cross-matching blood or in the investigation of transfusion reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Provision of equipment and reagents for the production of blood groups and phenotyping, RAI and direct Coombs test.
She was diagnosed with as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (ATHA) based on a high reticulocyte count, positive direct Coombs test, hemoglobinuria, and low haptoglobin level, and received the conventional treatment of prednisone (2 mg/kg in divided doses) and blood transfusions.
Her blood type was AB-Rh positive; the direct Coombs test was negative.
The patient was negative for hepatitis A, B, and C virus antibodies and antimitochondrial antibodies and had a negative direct Coombs test result.
31 -- Direct coombs test -- -- Negative -- Anti-HAV -- -- Negative -- Anti-HBC -- -- Negative -- HBsAg -- -- Negative -- Anti-HBs -- -- Negative -- Anti-HCV -- -- Negative -- Anti-AMA <1/20 -- Negative -- ALP = alkaline phosphatase; ALT = alanine aminotransferase; anti-AMA = antimitochondrial antibodies, anti-HAV = hepatitis A virus antibody; anti-HBs = hepatitis B surface antibody; anti-HBV = hepatitis B virus antibody; anti-HCV = hepatitis C virus antibody; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; GGT = A-glutamyltransferase; HBsAg = hepatitis B surface antigen
Moreover, results of a direct Coombs test were negative, although a routine peripheral blood smear revealed the presence of "bite cells.
A positive direct Coombs test indicates the presence of antibodies or complement on the surface of erythrocytes and is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolysis.
The presented patient's negative direct Coombs test indicated that erythroid suppression, rather than hemolysis was the predominant mechanism responsible for fetal anemia secondary to maternal Kell alloimmunization.
Pretransfusion compatibility testing continues, but it includes a major crossmatch (a serologic reaction between intended recipient serum and donor cells) only if one of the following conditions is met: 1) the patient's atypical antibody screen is positive; 2) the transfusion service's card file indicates a history of an antibody or a prior transfusion reaction; or 3) the patient has a positive direct Coombs test.
This would pertain providing the intended recipient has a negative atypical antibody screen and direct Coombs test and a negative transfusion reaction history.
Diagnoses were based on low-level hemoglobin, fragmented red cells, microspherocytes, polychromasia, macrocytosis, nucleated red cells on peripheral blood smear, elevated reticulocytes, and positive direct Coombs test (IgG+C3).
This year, we anticipate productivity benefits and reagent savings from a plan not to perform routine elutions on cord blood of type A or B newborns who have a positive direct Coombs test and were born to group O positive mothers.