diplopia


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Related to diplopia: vertigo, monocular diplopia, vertical diplopia

diplopia

 [dĭ-plo´pe-ah]
the perception of two images of a single object; called also double vision.
binocular diplopia double vision in which the images of an object are formed on noncorresponding points of the retinas.
crossed diplopia horizontal diplopia in which the image belonging to the right eye is displaced to the left of the image belonging to the left eye (divergent strabismus).
direct diplopia horizontal diplopia in which the image belonging to the right eye appears to the right of the image belonging to the left eye (convergent strabismus).
horizontal diplopia diplopia in which the two images lie in the same horizontal plane, being either direct or crossed.
vertical diplopia diplopia in which one image appears above the other in the same vertical plane.

di·plo·pi·a

(di-plō'pē-ă),
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision
[diplo- + G. ōps, eye]

diplopia

/di·plo·pia/ (dĭ-plo´pe-ah) the perception of two images of a single object.
binocular diplopia  double vision in which the images of an object are formed on noncorresponding points of the retinas.
crossed diplopia  diplopia in which the image belonging to the right eye is displaced to the left of the image belonging to the left eye.
direct diplopia  that in which the image belonging to the right eye appears to the right of the image belonging to the left eye.
heteronymous diplopia  crossed d.
homonymous diplopia  direct d.
horizontal diplopia  that in which the images lie in the same horizontal plane, being either direct or crossed.
monocular diplopia  perception by one eye of two images of a single object.
paradoxical diplopia  crossed d.
torsional diplopia  that in which the upper pole of the vertical axis of one image is inclined toward or away from that of the other.
vertical diplopia  that in which one image appears above the other in the same vertical plane.

diplopia

(dĭ-plō′pē-ə)
di·plo′pic (-plō′pĭk, dĭ-plŏp′ĭk) adj.

diplopia

[diplō′pē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, diploos + opsis, vision
double vision caused by defective function of the extraocular muscles or a disorder of the nerves that innervate the muscles. It occurs when the object of fixation falls on the fovea in one eye and a nonfoveal point in the other eye or when the object of fixation falls on two noncorresponding points. Also called ambiopia. Compare binocular vision.

diplopia

Double vision Ophthalmology A condition whereby a single object appears as 2

di·plo·pi·a

(dip-lō'pē-ă)
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision.
[G. diplous, double + G. ōps, eye]

diplopia

Double vision. The perception of two images of a single object. This occurs in squint (strabismus) when both eyes are not aligned on the object of interest. Diplopia with one eye is rare but possible.

Diplopia

The medical term for seeing double.
Mentioned in: Nasal Trauma

diplopia

The condition in which a single object is seen as two rather than one. This is usually due to images not stimulating corresponding retinal areas. Other causes are given below. Syn. double vision (colloquial). See differential prismatic effect; haplopia; myasthenia gravis; retinal corresponding points; polyopia; multiple sclerosis; strabismus; diplopia test; triplopia.
binocular diplopia Diplopia in which one image is seen by one eye and the other image is seen by the other eye.
crossed diplopia See heteronymous diplopia.
heteronymous diplopia Binocular diplopia in which the image received by the right eye appears to the left and that received by the left eye appears to the right. In this condition the images are formed on the temporal retina. Syn. crossed diplopia.
homonymous diplopia Binocular diplopia in which the image received by the right eye appears to the right and that received by the left eye appears to the left. In this condition, the images are formed on the nasal retina. Syn. uncrossed diplopia.
incongruous diplopia Diplopia present in individuals with abnormal retinal correspondence in which the relative positions of the two images differ from what would be expected on the basis of normal retinal correspondence. Example: an exotrope experiencing homonymous diplopia instead of heteronymous diplopia. Syn. paradoxical diplopia. See abnormal retinal correspondence.
monocular diplopia Diplopia seen by one eye only. It is usually caused by irregular refraction in one eye (e.g. in early cataracts, corneal opacity) or by dicoria or polycoria. It may be induced by placing a biprism in front of one eye. See ghost image; luxation of the lens.
paradoxical diplopia See incongruous diplopia.
pathological diplopia Any diplopia due to an eye disease (e.g. proptosis), an anomaly of binocular vision (e.g. strabismus), a variation in the refractive index of the media of the eye (e.g. cataract), a subluxation of the crystalline lens, or to a general disease (e.g. multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis). See exophthalmos; luxation of the lens.
physiological diplopia Normal phenomenon which occurs in binocular vision for non-fixated objects whose images fall on disparate retinal points. It is easily demonstrated to persons with normal binocular vision: fixate binocularly a distant object and place a pencil vertically some 25 cm in front of your nose. You should see two rather blurred pencils. The observation of physiological diplopia has been found to be useful in the management of eso or exo deviations, suppression, abnormal retinal correspondence, etc. (Fig. D4). See Brock string; retinal disparity.
diplopia test See diplopia test.
uncrossed diplopia See homonymous diplopia.
Fig. D4 Physiological diplopia. The subject fixates a distant object Aenlarge picture
Fig. D4 Physiological diplopia. The subject fixates a distant object A

di·plo·pi·a

(dip-lō'pē-ă)
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision.
[G. diplous, double + G. ōps, eye]

diplopia (diplō´pēə),

n seeing a single object as two images. May occur after fracture of the bony orbital cavity as a result of displacement of the globe of the eye inferiorly.

diplopia

seeing two images; double vision.

Patient discussion about diplopia

Q. what is the cause for double vision

A. Double vision, or diplopia, as it's called, may be due to many conditions, including disorders of the muscles of the eye (extra-ocular muscles) and the nerves controlling them, disorders of the eye ball (enlarged eyeball as in Graves' ), and sometimes disorders of vision.

Diplopia may manifest important conditions, so consulting a doctor (e.g. neurologist or ophthalmologist) may be wise.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003029.htm

More discussions about diplopia
References in periodicals archive ?
4) As previously mentioned, diplopia is an unusual symptom in this disease.
Prodromal symptoms, such as viral-like illness, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting, are followed acutely to subacutely by gait unsteadiness progressing rapidly to ataxia, diplopia, often nystagmus, dysarthria, and dysphagia (4, 5).
In the patient reported here, meningitis was complicated by permanent deafness, ataxia, and transient diplopia; to our knowledge, only 2 other cases complicated by diplopia have been reported (8,9).
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In our case, the patient had a hyperintense lesion in the pontine area and the presenting symptom, subacute diplopia, might result from brainstem involvement due to the localization of the lesion.
On examination he had horizontal diplopia consistent with an isolated right sided Vlth cranial nerve palsy.
Facial sweating was preserved and ocular movements were intact with no diplopia or other cranial nerve or long tract deficit, in keeping with a left postganglionic Horner's syndrome.
And he has achieved great results, despite suffering from diplopia, a deteriorating eye condition that causes double vision and a delay in vision.
Trauma can lead to the development of retinal detachment or clouding of the lens, as well as issues with arterial blood flow that can cause loss of acuity, loss of sight and visual field, and diplopia or double vision (Weichel, Coyler, Bautista, Bower, & French, 2009).
ISTANBUL, Sep 23, 2010 (TUR) -- The 11th World Diplopia Congress began in north-western province of Istanbul on Thursday.
Pupil abnormalities, diplopia, and transient visual loss have been grouped under neuro-ophthalmic entities.