diploid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to diploid: partial diploid

diploid

 [dip´loid]
1. having a pair of each chromosome characteristic of a species (2n or, in man, 46).
2. a diploid individual or cell.

dip·loid

(dip'loyd),
Denoting the state of a cell containing two haploid sets derived from the father and from the mother respectively; the normal chromosome complement of somatic cells (in humans, 46 chromosomes).
[diplo- + G. eidos resemblance]

diploid

/dip·loid/ (dip´loid)
1. having two sets of chromosomes, as normally found in the somatic cells; in humans, the diploid number is 46.
2. an individual or cell having two full sets of homologous chromosomes.

diploid

(dĭp′loid′)
adj.
1. Double or twofold.
2. Genetics Having a pair of each type of chromosome, so that the basic chromosome number is doubled: diploid somatic cells.
n. Genetics
A cell, organism, or group of organisms having a diploid number of chromosomes.

diploid (2n)

[dip′loid]
Etymology: Gk, diploos + eidos, form
having two complete sets of homologous chromosomes, such as are normally found in somatic cells and primordial germ cells before maturation. In humans the normal diploid number is 46. Also called diploidic. Compare haploid, tetraploid, triploid.

diploid

adjective Referring to diploidy, see there. noun Having 2 haploid sets of chromosomes, one from an egg, one from sperm

dip·loid

(dip'loyd)
Denoting the state of a cell containing two haploid sets derived from the father and from the mother respectively; the normal chromosome complement of somatic cells (in humans, 46 chromosomes).
[diplo- + G. eidos resemblance]

diploid

Having an identical (homologous) pair of chromosomes for each characteristic except sex. This is the normal state of most body cells. Eggs and sperms, however, have only a single set of half the number of chromosomes, and are said to be haploid. Red blood cells have no chromosomes.

diploid

  1. (of a cell nucleus) containing two of each type of chromosome in homologous pairs and formed as a result of sexual reproduction.
  2. an organism in which the main life stage has cell nuclei with two of each type of chromosome, written as 2n. Diploid stages occur in all EUKARYOTES apart from certain fungi, and allow a greater degree of genetic variability in individuals than the HAPLOID (2) state (n).

diploid

stage within sex cell division when the gamete contains twice the normal number of chromosomes, i.e. 48 pairs rather than the normal 24 pairs

diploid

1. having a pair of each chromosome characteristic of a species, i.e. genomes in which chromosomes occur in pairs.
2. a diploid individual or cell.

human diploid cell vaccine
see human diploid cell vaccine.
diploid karyotype
a karyotype consisting of chromosomes in pairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
In diploid organisms, the testis occupies approximately one-third of the total gonad sac, it begins close to the foot and runs along the length of the external gonad sac surface (Fig.
Suggestions for further research: 1) Among the points that still need clarification is the origin of regularly fertilized but monopronuclear oocytes that result in diploid embryos carrying the genomes of both parents.
A preliminary analysis was conducted to explore the economic assessment of culturing diploid and triploid at the three sites.
Time dependent death rates of haploid gynogen, diploid gynogen and control group embryos are shown at Table 1.
Six populations were used in this study, including two comprised solely of diploid individuals, two comprised solely of tetraploid individuals, and two of mixed-ploidy (i.
The second reason we think polygyne queens may mate with diploid males carrying unreduced sperm is the unusual pattern of mating that would need to be invoked in order to explain our data otherwise.
Polysomaty analysis in diploid and tetraploid Portulaca grandiflora.
However, since the pollen is diploid rather than monoploid, it
villwocki have the same diploid chromosome number as other species of Aphanius that were previously studied.
Approximately 75% of clinically ascertained molar pregnancy are CHMs and mostly of diploid, androgenetic origin, and the remaining 25% are PHMs and mostly of diandric, triploid origin (18), (19).
The bulk of the analyzed cells are characterized by normal diploid chromosomes for cattle--79.
Because fetal cells are less mature than the cells after birth, it was critical to determine if diploid pluripotent stem cells could be derived from die cells of both infants and adults.