teeth

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Related to diphyodont teeth: milk dentition, diphyodont dentition

teeth

 [tēth]
plural of tooth.

teeth

odontophobia.

teeth

(tēth),
Plural of tooth.

teeth

(tēth)
n.
Plural of tooth.

teeth

See tooth.

TEETH

Tried Everything Else, Try Homeopathy. An acronym born of desperation when a deteriorating patient (e.g., with cancer, advanced rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis or other chronic non-remitting, progressive diseases) is refractory to any form of therapy, thus justifying the use of any measure, however statistically ineffective it might be.

teeth

(tēth)
Plural of tooth.

tooth

(tooth) (teth) plural.teeth
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STRUCTURE OF A TOOTH: (longitudinal section)
Any of the hard, bony conical structures of the upper and lower jaws used for chewing. A tooth consists of a crown portion above the gum, a root portion embedded in a socket (alveolus) of the jaw bone, and a neck or cervical constricted region between the crown and root. The soft-tissue gingiva covers the neck and root to a variable extent, depending on age and oral hygiene. The major portion of a tooth consists of dentin, which is harder than bone; enamel; and cementum, which is similar to bone. The pulp cavity contains the dental pulp. Each tooth has five surfaces: occlusal, mesial, distal, lingual, and facial or buccal. See: illustration; dentition

Everyone has two complete sets of teeth during his life. The 20 primary teeth are the first set of teeth a person develops. They exfoliate by age 14 and are replaced by the 32 permanent teeth. The permanent teeth include the following: incisors, canines (cuspids), premolars (bicuspids), and molars. On average, a child should have 6 teeth at 1 year, 12 teeth at 18 months, 16 teeth at 2 years, and 20 teeth at 12 years. Some children are born with a few erupted teeth; in other children the teeth may not appear until 16 months.

Patient care

Health care professionals should assess patients’ teeth and gums during physical examinations, educate patients about routine dental hygiene (brushing, flossing, gum stimulation, use of oral rinses), and refer them to a dental professional for dental caries, eruption anomalies, or periodontal problems.

See: dental plaque; periodontal disease

accessional tooth

A permanent molar tooth that arises without deciduous predecessors in the dental arch.

anterior tooth

The central and lateral incisors and/or the canines, located adjacent to the midline of the maxilla or mandible.

baby tooth

Deciduous tooth.

bicuspid tooth

A permanent, premolar tooth. There are eight premolars, two in each quadrant (four in each jaw) between the canines and molars. Premolars have two or three cusps on the occlusal surface.

bull tooth

Taurodontism.

cracked tooth

A tooth whose enamel and dentin are fractured.
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DECIDUOUS TEETH (LEFT SIDE)

deciduous tooth

Any of the 20 teeth that make up the primary dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.
Synonym: baby tooth; milk tooth; primary tooth See: illustration

hypersensitive tooth

A tooth sensitive to temperature changes, sweets, or percussion. It may exhibit gingival recession, exposed root dentin, caries, or periodontal disease.

Treatment

Popular treatments for hypersensitivity include topical varnishes, sealants, and topical fluoride applications. Other treatments include application of silver nitrate, formalin, glycerin, strontium chloride, potassium nitrate, calcium compounds, sodium citrate, and potassium oxalate.

Patient care

The patient can reduce sensitivity by a regimen of plaque control, dentifrice with fluoride, self-applied fluoride, and control of diet.

impacted tooth

A tooth unable to erupt due to crowding by adjacent teeth, malposition of the tooth, or developmental disturbances.

malacotic tooth

A tooth soft in structure, white in color, and esp. prone to decay.

milk tooth

Deciduous tooth.

permanent tooth

Any of the 32 teeth that develop as the second dentition and replace the deciduous teeth.
Synonym: secondary tooth See: deciduous tooth for illus

primary tooth

Deciduous tooth.

sclerotic tooth

A yellowish tooth that is naturally hard and highly resistant to caries.

secondary tooth

Permanent tooth.

succedaneous tooth

In dentistry, a permanent tooth that succeeds (replaces) a normally erupted deciduous tooth. It includes the premanent incisors, cuspids, and premolars. The deciduous molars are replaced by the permanent premolars, which are not succedaneous teeth.

wisdom tooth

Any of the third most-distal molars on each side of both jaws. These four molars may appear as late as the 25th year or may never erupt.

teeth

The instruments of biting (incisors), tearing (canines) and grinding (molars) of food. There are 20 primary teeth and 32 permanent teeth, but it is common for one or more of the third molars, at the back (the ‘wisdom teeth’) to remain within the gum (unerupted) until well into adult life. The permanent teeth are numbered, 1 to 8, from the centre, in each quadrant. A dentist might thus refer to an ‘upper right 3’ meaning the patient's top right canine tooth.

teeth

(tēth)
Plural of tooth.

teeth,

n See tooth.
teeth, hypermobile,
n the propensity of teeth to abnormally move or shift positions within the alveolar bone. This condition can occur as a result of inflammation, metabolic abnormalities, or traumatic injury.
teeth, milk,
teeth, opposing,
n teeth that are opposite each other, one in the maxilla and one in the mandible, that ideally come into occlusal contact with each other.
teeth, short,
n teeth that are severely worn from erosion or abrasion.
teeth, splayed anterior,
n anterior teeth that have been forced to slope outward, usually as a result of pressure from the tongue.
teeth, tilted,
n teeth that are at such an angle as to cause them to be out of centric contact with opposing teeth during occlusion.

teeth

small, bonelike structures of the jaws for the biting and mastication of food. Plural of tooth. See also dental, tooth.

teeth abscess
see alveolar1 abscess, malar abscess.
accessional teeth
the permanent molars, so called because they have no deciduous predecessors in the dental arch.
anelodont teeth
teeth with a limited period of growth.
anterior teeth
usually taken to include incisors and canines.
teeth attrition
see dental attrition.
baby teeth
see deciduous teeth (below).
brachyodont teeth
a type of dentition as seen in humans and pigs; the teeth have short crowns, well developed roots and a narrow root canal. See also hypsodont, bunodont.
bunodont teeth
canine teeth
the long, pointed tooth in the interdental space between incisors and cheek teeth; there is one in each jaw on both sides.
carnassial teeth
teeth cavity
see dental cavity, pulp cavity.
deciduous teeth
the temporary set of teeth that erupt in the young and are shed before or near maturity. They have smaller crowns and root systems and are fewer in number than the permanent teeth that replace them. Called also milk teeth, temporary teeth, baby teeth. Occasionally, particularly in small breeds of dogs, shedding of the deciduous tooth may not occur when the permanent replacement has erupted, necessitating veterinary intervention.
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Retained deciduous canine tooth in a dog.
diphyodont teeth
displaced molar teeth
see inherited displacement of molar teeth.
ectopic teeth
see dental cyst.
embedded teeth
unerupted.
congenital teeth enamel deficiency
see inherited enamel defect.
teeth eruption time
see Table 19.
teeth excessive wear
occurs in animals on high fluorine intake or on diets low in calcium.
geminous teeth
teeth grinding
1. grinding of the incisors to improve foraging ability. Has been done to sheep with an industrial angle grinder with indifferent results.
2. see bruxism.
heterodont teeth
homodont teeth
hypsodont teeth
a form of dentition, seen in horses and many ruminants; the crown is high (deep), the root is short.
impacted teeth
one so placed in the jaw that it is unable to erupt or to attain its normal position in occlusion.
incisor teeth
the front teeth used for cropping grass or rending flesh. From two to four in each quadrant, depending on the species, except that they are missing in the upper jaw of ruminants.
inherited molar teeth displacement
see inherited displacement of molar teeth.
lophodont teeth
cheek teeth with ridged occlusal surfaces. See also lophodont.
teeth maleruption
defective eruption; includes delayed eruption and more usually eruption out of its normal position.
milk teeth
see deciduous teeth (above).
molar teeth
the permanent, primary cheek teeth that are not preceded by premolars. They are typically big teeth used for grinding and with ridges on their occlusal surfaces (lophodont) in horses, worn rounded cusps (bunodont) in pigs, or including crescents (selenodont) in cattle, and either cutting edges or flattened areas in carnivores.
monophyodont teeth
needle teeth
any small sharp teeth in piglets but principally the canine teeth.
permanent teeth
see permanent dentition.
teeth pigmentation
see tetracycline stain.
pink teeth
caused by staining with porphyrin, or by deficiency of dentine and enamel, a congenital defect.
premature teeth loss
a problem in New Zealand sheep. Characterized by acute then chronic gingivitis, then periodontitis and loss of teeth. Cause unknown.
premolar teeth
cheek teeth present in both generations, found between the molars and canines. The first premolar is exceptional in humans because it erupts late and is never replaced. In domestic species, there are up to three or four deciduous, followed by up to four permanent premolars in both jaws and on both sides.
teeth rasp
see tooth rasp.
retained teeth
deciduous premolars or incisors may be retained even though the permanent teeth have erupted. The deciduous crowns are likely to protrude at odd angles and cause difficult mastication.
secodont teeth
sectorial teeth
a cutting tooth. See carnassial tooth.
selenodont teeth
teeth with crescents in their grinding surfaces, as in the cheek teeth of ruminants.
sharp teeth
the edges of molar teeth in the horse which require frequent rasping because of the injury that they might cause to the oral mucosa.
stained teeth
red-brown in inherited porphyrinuria in cattle, frequent dosing with tetracyclines, heavy staining with brown tartar in ruminants with a rumination and prehension problem, usually due to loss of anterior part of tongue.
supernumerary teeth
teeth in excess of the normal complement, e.g. double row of incisors. Called also polyodontia, heterotopic polydontia.
temporary teeth
see deciduous teeth (above).
wolf teeth

Patient discussion about teeth

Q. what would be the best way to protect my teeth from decaying?i fill pain always in my private parties,what prb whenever i take long with out sex,so i would like the advice from my fewwol

A. i fail to see the connection between teeth and groin pain...about the teeth. it's very very simple- get used to a healthy oral hygiene. brush your teeth in the right way twice a day for at least 6 minute. use floss. go to a dental hygienist, she'll guide you through it.

Q. What are wisdom teeth? Why so many people talk about them and suffer from them?

A. Wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars that most people get in their late teens or early twenties. Sometimes these teeth can be a valuable asset to the mouth when healthy and properly aligned, but more often, they are misaligned and require removal. Wisdom teeth present potential problems when they are misaligned – they can position themselves horizontally, be angled toward or away from the second molars or be angled inward or outward. Poor alignment of wisdom teeth can crowd or damage adjacent teeth, the jawbone, or nerves. Wisdom teeth that lean toward the second molars make those teeth more vulnerable to decay by entrapping plaque and debris. In addition, wisdom teeth can be entrapped completely within the soft tissue and/or the jawbone or only partially break through or erupt through the gum. For complete article: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/wisdom-teeth This one is good also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_teeth Hope this helps.

More discussions about teeth