diphyllobothriasis


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diphyllobothriasis

 [di-fil″o-both-ri´ah-sis]
infection with Diphyllobothrium.

di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis

(dī-fil'ō-both-rī'ă-sis),
Infection with the cestode Diphyllobothrium latum; human infection is caused by ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked fish infected with the plerocercoid larva. Leukocytosis and eosinophilia may occur; if the worm is located high enough in the alimentary canal, it may preempt the supply of vitamin B12 or alter its absorption, leading to hyperchromic macrocytic anemia resembling pernicious anemia, although the condition is rare, even in hyperendemic areas.

diphyllobothriasis

/di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis/ (di-fil″o-both-ri´ah-sis) infection with Diphyllobothrium.

diphyllobothriasis

A genus of tapeworm containing several species which is found in the intestine of fish, birds, and mammals including man. Infection in humans is usually by eating uncooked fish. The larval stage is known as Sparganum. The species that most often infects humans is Diphyllobothrium latum, a giant freshwater fish tapeworm of North America and Europe. See fish tapeworm infection.

di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis

(dī-fil'ō-both-rī'ă-sis)
Infection with the cestode Diphyllobothrium latum; human infection is caused by ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked fish infected with the plerocercoid larva. Leukocytosis and eosinophilia may occur; if the worm is high enough in the alimentary canal, it may preempt the supply of vitamin B12 or alter its absorption, leading to hyperchromic macrocytic anemia.

Diphyllobothriasis

Parasitic infection caused by the presence of tapeworms from the Diphyllobothrium genus, such as the fish tapeworm (Diphyllobothrium latum).
Mentioned in: Tapeworm Diseases

diphyllobothriasis

infection with Diphyllobothrium spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cases of diphyllobothriasis may be asymptomatic or produce vague gastrointestinal signs as a result of the presence of the worm in the host's intestinal tract.
Dogs and cats with diphyllobothriasis show clinical signs associated with gastrointestinal disease such as diarrhea, weight loss, and vomiting.
Diphyllobothriasis associated with eating raw Pacific salmon.
A case of human diphyllobothriasis after eating Plecoglossus altivelis [in Chinese].
Standen 2010 Possible influence of the ENSO phenomenon on the pathoecology of diphyllobothriasis and anisakiasis in ancient Chinchorro populations.
Urban 2003 Diagnosing ancient diphyllobothriasis from Chinchorro mummies.
Diphyllobothriasis nihonkaiense was once endemic to coastal provinces of central and northern Japan, where salmon fisheries thrived.
Recent Surge of Pacific Salmon-associated Diphyllobothriasis
These cases of diphyllobothriasis are noteworthy because this parasite was totally unknown to clinicians and parasitologists in Brazil, where it does not appear to have an endemic life cycle (5-9).
Assuming the epidemioiogic information presented here explains the appearance of the fish tapeworm outbreak in Brazil, it would be preferable, in terms of sanitation, for the Chilean aquaculture industry to stop growing salmon smelt in the lakes in the areas where diphyllobothriasis is endemic in humans and animals (11-17).
Cases of human diphyllobothriasis have been reported worldwide.
Diphyllobothriasis is an intestinal parasitosis acquired by eating raw or partially cooked fish containing Diphyllobothrium spp.