diphyllobothriasis


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diphyllobothriasis

 [di-fil″o-both-ri´ah-sis]
infection with Diphyllobothrium.

di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis

(dī-fil'ō-both-rī'ă-sis),
Infection with the cestode Diphyllobothrium latum; human infection is caused by ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked fish infected with the plerocercoid larva. Leukocytosis and eosinophilia may occur; if the worm is located high enough in the alimentary canal, it may preempt the supply of vitamin B12 or alter its absorption, leading to hyperchromic macrocytic anemia resembling pernicious anemia, although the condition is rare, even in hyperendemic areas.

diphyllobothriasis

/di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis/ (di-fil″o-both-ri´ah-sis) infection with Diphyllobothrium.

diphyllobothriasis

A genus of tapeworm containing several species which is found in the intestine of fish, birds, and mammals including man. Infection in humans is usually by eating uncooked fish. The larval stage is known as Sparganum. The species that most often infects humans is Diphyllobothrium latum, a giant freshwater fish tapeworm of North America and Europe. See fish tapeworm infection.

di·phyl·lo·both·ri·a·sis

(dī-fil'ō-both-rī'ă-sis)
Infection with the cestode Diphyllobothrium latum; human infection is caused by ingestion of raw or inadequately cooked fish infected with the plerocercoid larva. Leukocytosis and eosinophilia may occur; if the worm is high enough in the alimentary canal, it may preempt the supply of vitamin B12 or alter its absorption, leading to hyperchromic macrocytic anemia.

Diphyllobothriasis

Parasitic infection caused by the presence of tapeworms from the Diphyllobothrium genus, such as the fish tapeworm (Diphyllobothrium latum).
Mentioned in: Tapeworm Diseases

diphyllobothriasis

infection with Diphyllobothrium spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Possible influence of the ENSO phenomenon on the pathoecology of diphyllobothriasis and anisakiasis in ancient Chinchorro populations.
Molecular diagnosis of diphyllobothriasis in Spain, most presumably acquired via imported fish, or sojourn abroad.
We retrospectively examined annual case numbers of diphyllobothriasis nihonkaiense in 2 institutes; the Department of Medical Zoology of the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine in Kyoto (MZ) and the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital (BH) in Tokyo.
From 1988 through 2008, a total of 149 cases of diphyllobothriasis have been recorded: 95 at MZ and 54 at BH.
A causal relationship between the anemia or eosinophilia and diphyllobothriasis nihonkaiense for these patients was not determined because neither the type of anemia nor the outcome of anemia or eosinophilia after treatment was examined.
Wild Pacific Salmon and Risk for Diphyllobothriasis Nihonkaiense
Until recently, diphyllobothriasis nihonkaiense had been reported almost exclusively in Japan.
As has been the case with other human infectious diseases disseminated by the industrialization of animal husbandry, this outbreak of diphyllobothriasis could have been prevented by use of existing information, including that concerning the endemic nature of diphyllobothriasis in the lakes of southern Chile and its transmission by raw fish.
Human diphyllobothriasis has been reported in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America.
Since diphyllobothriasis was a rare disease in Brazil, 5 cases diagnosed from March to August 2004 were of interest.
From September 2004 to January 2005, stool specimens of patients who ate raw fish were examined to determine the prevalence of diphyllobothriasis.
19/1,000, of diphyllobothriasis were found in the patients who ate raw fish.