dimorphism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to dimorphism: Gender dimorphism

dimorphism

 [di-mor´fizm]
the quality of existing in two distinct forms. adj., adj dimor´phic, dimor´phous.
sexual dimorphism physical or behavioral differences associated with sex.
having some properties of both sexes, as in the early embryo and in some hermaphrodites.

di·mor·phism

(dī-mōr'fizm),
1. Existence in two shapes or forms; denoting a difference of crystalline form exhibited by the same substance, or a difference in form or outward appearance between individuals of the same species (for example, sexual dimorphism).
2. The occurrence in plants of two distinct forms of leaves or other parts in the same individual plant.
[G. di-, two, + morphē, shape]

dimorphism

/di·mor·phism/ (di-mor´fizm) the quality of existing in two distinct forms.dimor´phicdimor´phous
sexual dimorphism 
1. physical or behavioral differences associated with sex.
2. having some properties of both sexes, as in the early embryo and in some hermaphrodites.

dimorphism

(dī-môr′fĭz′əm)
n.
1. Biology The existence among animals of the same species of two distinct forms that differ in one or more characteristics, such as coloration, size, or shape.
2. Botany The occurrence of two distinct forms of the same parts in one plant, as in the juvenile and adult leaves of ivy.
3. Chemistry & Physics Dimorphic crystallization.

di·mor·phism

(dī-mōr'fizm)
Existence in two shapes or forms; denoting a difference of crystalline form exhibited by the same substance, or a difference in form or outward appearance between individuals of the same species.
[G. di-, two, + morphē, shape]

dimorphism

the occurrence of an organism in two forms, e.g. the male and the female (see SEXUAL DIMORPHISM). Dimorphism can occur in body form or in colour phases, e.g. the two-spotted ladybird which has a brown form with four red spots, and a red form with two dark spots. See GENETIC POLYMORPHISM.

dimorphism

the quality of existing in two distinct forms.

sexual dimorphism
1. physical or behavioral differences associated with sex; males and females of the same species are different in appearance.
2. having some properties of both sexes, as in the early embryo and in some hermaphrodites.
References in periodicals archive ?
24) Studies of PTSD rates use variable methods for measuring and diagnosing PTSD, making a firm conclusion about dimorphism in PTSD rates difficult.
Owens and Hartley (1998) found a relationship between species lacking sexual dimorphism and the prevalence of social monogamy along with a corresponding low incidence of extra-pair mating and paternity.
As the bush cricket Metrioptera roeselii (Hagenbach, 1822) is characterized by wing dimorphism and a higher frequency of long-winged individuals in dry-hot environmental conditions, this orthopteran classifies as an ideal candidate for climate studies (Marshall and Haes, 1988; Gardiner, 2009).
Antennal flagellar setae of decapod shrimps: sexual dimorphism and possible role in detection of contact sex pheromones.
This observation is in agreement with those of other authors, who reported that the presence or absence of the uncus, mucro, and premucro is a set of characters to be considered in order to determine sexual dimorphism in various species of the Curculionidae, such as Sternechus subsignatus (Rosado-Neto 1987), and Chalcodermus bicolor Fiedler 1936; Loja Cedeno 2011), as well as numerous species of the genus Bondarius (Dos-Santos 2007).
Studies of other species of shrikes have reported conflicting patterns of sexual dimorphism.
2011), these morphological characters are related to sexual dimorphism and are controlled by environmental and food resources.
Using the PSAI, we found both positive and negative associations of prenatal exposure to different POP classes, namely PCDD/Fs and PCBs, with parent-reported behavioral sexual dimorphism in children at school age.
Washington, Apr 4 ( ANI ): Sexual dimorphism has evolved in animals because such traits help males to obtain additional offspring.
Partnership status and the temporal context of relationships influence human female preferences for sexual dimorphism in male face shape.
Typically, only one species was illustrated per page, with both males and females presented together to show sexual dimorphism.
Caroline explained: "Macleays spectre stick insects show dimorphism, which means they are clearly different; females are long with thick bodi-es and can't fly, while males are smaller and have really long wings and are fliers.