dimension

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di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn),
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.

dimension

a measure of the width, length, or height of a space, usually described in units of a linear scale.

di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn)
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.

di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn)
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.
References in classic literature ?
Well, I do not mind telling you I have been at work upon this geometry of Four Dimensions for some time.
Surely the mercury did not trace this line in any of the dimensions of Space generally recognized?
And why cannot we move in Time as we move about in the other dimensions of Space?
Our mental existences, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave.
But now you begin to see the object of my investigations into the geometry of Four Dimensions.
His external balloon, which had the dimensions given above, contained a less one of the same shape, which was only forty-five feet in horizontal, and sixty-eight feet in vertical diameter.
Now, reserving for another discussion the means of producing this velocity, I will call your attention to the dimensions which it will be proper to assign to the shot.
But then," replied the major, "you will have to give this projectile enormous dimensions.
What they do," said Perry, "is to project their thoughts into the fourth dimension, when they become appreciable to the sixth sense of their listener.
Our brains often take us to higher dimensions to simplify what is seen.
Information Dimensions' focus on product development and its early selection of SGML as an open standard has been justified by SAAB's decision to adopt Information Dimensions and SGML as the basis of their integrated system.
Although this dimension of CIS represents the ultimate power of a computerized patient record, it is not realizable until dimensions X and Y are in place.