dimension

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di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn),
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.

dimension

a measure of the width, length, or height of a space, usually described in units of a linear scale.

di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn)
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.

di·men·sion

(di-men'shŭn)
Scope, size, magnitude; denoting, in the plural, linear measurements of length, width, and height.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial designs should show those logical dimensions even if they will not be physically generated.
Thematic dimensions demarcating developmental changes in participant thinking related to problem solving acts of teacher leadership are discussed in the section that follows.
It seems mysterious, but there are these special dimensions out there," says Henry Cohn of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Wash.
As well as being consonant with dimensions of spiritual wellness listed above, this notion of entelechy is compatible with the mission of public education.
Retirees who want to balance future work with family responsibilities frequently look for part-time work as one element of the environment dimensions in their career plans.
Having clarified the structures of both Islam and science, we are now in a better position to relate, in an essential and significant way, the corresponding dimensions and elements in the two structures.
Our brains often take us to higher dimensions to simplify what is seen.
This dimension involves a comprehensive database of all patient encounters with any aspect of the health care system (e.
Because it predicts part dimensions for each shot, it eliminates scrap that may occur between scheduled quality checks performed with SPC.
The Hugo Neu investment will enable us to roll out our suite of products much more rapidly and is a great show of faith in our vision for the company," said Bennett Stewart, CEO of EVA Dimensions.
This analysis suggested that the four-factor model demonstrated a fairly good fit with the hypothesized dimensions and provided a theoretically sound model.
Perhaps some of those extra dimensions weren't so tightly confined, suggested Savas Dimopoulos of Stanford University, Nima Arkani-Hamed, now at the University of California, Berkeley, and Georgi Dvali, now at New York University.