dilution

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Related to dilutions: Dilution Factor

dilution

 [di-loo´shun]
1. reduction of concentration of an active substance by admixture of a neutral agent.
2. a substance that has undergone such a process.
serial dilution a set of dilutions in a mathematical sequence. In microbiological technique, serial dilutions are used to obtain a culture plate that yields a countable number of separate colonies. From this, a calculation of viable cells in the original suspension can be made, as a colony picked for pure culture.

di·lu·tion

(dī-lū'shŭn),
1. The act of being diluted.
2. A diluted solution or mixture.
3. In microbiologic techniques, a method for counting the number of viable cells in a suspension; a sample is diluted to the point where an aliquot, when plated, yields a countable number of separate colonies.

dilution

/di·lu·tion/ (di-loo´shun)
1. reduction of concentration of an active substance by admixture of a neutral agent.
2. a substance that has undergone dilution.
3. in homeopathy, the diffusion of a given quantity of a medicinal agent in ten or one hundred times the same quantity of water.dilu´tional

serial dilution  a set of dilutions in a mathematical sequence, as to obtain a culture plate with a countable number of separate colonies.

di·lu·tion

(di-lū'shŭn)
1. The act of being diluted.
2. A diluted solution or mixture.
3. microbiology A method for counting the number of viable cells in a suspension; a sample is diluted to the point at which an aliquot, when plated, yields a countable number of separate colonies.

dilution (di·lōōˑ·shn),

n decreasing the concentration; for essential oils used in aromatherapy, the dilution range is between 1% and 5%.
dilutions, ultra-high,
n.pl in homeo-pathy, solutions of substances that have been repeatedly agitated and diluted.

dilution

1. reduction of concentration of an active substance by admixture of a neutral agent.
2. a substance that has undergone dilution.

limit dilution
a method of obtaining a pure culture of bacteria or virus by subculturing from the highest dilution in which the organism is demonstrably present.
serial dilution
1. the progressive dilution of a substance or infectious agent in a series of tubes or wells in a tray in predetermined ratios, e.g. 2-fold or 10-fold dilution steps.
2. a method of obtaining a pure bacterial culture by rapid transfer of a small amount of material from one nutrient medium to a succeeding one of the same volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
were designed to prohibit trademark dilution, there is a wide
After the lab, 50% of the students felt that the lab had helped them a lot with their understanding of serial dilutions and 50% felt that the lab had helped them somewhat.
In this method the PNT baseline was arbitrarily set at an absorbance by plotting the average of triplicate, corrected absorbance readings at serial dilutions of the observed titres for positive and negative sera.
The dilution protocol recommended by Abbott (18) is a twofold dilution, prepared before assay set up, with equal amounts of patient specimen and calibrator A.
Figures 4, 5 and 6 show the effects of cure temperature and adhesive dilution on primary adhesion, with two, four and six minute cures, respectively.
Hence, it is relevant that the imported kits, which are being used for diagnostic tests in our population, should be validated using serum samples from local population with a view to define the screening dilutions.
The 1:1 (undiluted) and resulting 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 dilutions were assayed on a Beckman LX20 for cholesterol.
This competitive ELISA detected brevetoxins in seawater, shellfish extract and homogenate, and mammalian body fluid such as urine and serum without pretreatment, dilution, or purification.
The dilution research is not completely blown out of the water, however.
Paratek will use the Staccato system's plate replication and serial dilution capabilities for assay work in determining MICs (Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations) for anti-bacterial drug discovery applications.
The present study was therefore carried out to attempt to standardize the dilutions with a single diluent and a single dilution.
Thus the discrepancies between the two methods were markedly increased when dilutions were involved.