dilator

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dilator

 [di-la´ter]
a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr), This abridgment of dilatator is not correct Latin and is not recognized in TA.
1. An instrument designed to enlarge a hollow structure or opening.
See also: bougie.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
See also: bougie.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
See also: bougie.
Synonym(s): dilatator

dilator

/di·la·tor/ (di-lāt´er)
1. a structure that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator

(dī-lā′tər, dī′lā′-, dĭ-lā′-)
n.
1. A muscle that dilates a body part, such as a blood vessel or the pupil of the eye.
2. An instrument that dilates a body part, such as a cavity, canal, or orifice.

dilator

[dī′lātər]
Etymology: L, dilatare, to widen
a device for expanding a body opening or cavity. Examples include a tent dilator, consisting of a sponge or bundle of seaweed that expands the cervical os, and a Barnes' bag (dilator), a rubber bag that can be inserted into a body cavity and filled with water to produce pressure on the cavity walls.

dilator

Therapeutics A device used to stretch/enlarge an opening or tubular structure–eg, esophagus, to allow the passage of food. See Bougienage.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An instrument designed for enlarging a hollow structure or opening.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.

dilator

Any instrument used to widen or enlarge an opening, orifice or passage. Dilators are extensively used in surgery.

dilator

  1. a muscle whose contraction opens an aperture or orifice; an example is the dilator muscle of the eye.
  2. a drug whose effect is the expansion of a structure.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
See: dilatator.

dilator

a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator pupillae muscle
dilator muscle of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Otolaryngologists have used hydrostatic wire-guided controlled expansion balloon dilators specifically designed for pulmonary use for the purpose of tracheoplasty (7).
They range from ear-plugs for you to a nasal dilator for your noisy partner.
For women who have attempted but failed to create a vagina using vaginal dilators without surgery, laparoscopic creation of the neovagina, followed by a period of use of vaginal dilators (approximately 4-6 months in one study), makes it possible for women with vaginal agenesis to engage in vaginal intercourse.
Acutek further stated that it is confident that the patent rights it has acquired together with its own ongoing patent position will ultimately give it the dominant patent position in the nasal dilator category over all competitors, including CNS' Breathe Right(TM) product.
Pasquale Ciaglia initially reported PDT in 1985 and in 1990 the first Ciaglia percutaneous tracheostomy introducer set with sequential dilators was introduced.
CPU , Craniotomy Artery ,Croned Scissor (Eye) , Cupboard Small Steel , Cupboard Steel Big , Curved Dilators , Curved Scissor , Defibrilator ECG Cable , DHs Plates , Digital Sign Board , Doppler charger and probe ,E Fixator Rod, Ecexutie Chair Small , ECG Charges , ECG Machine battery 6108.
Although vessel dilators are a common treatment for the millions of Americans who suffer ischemic chest pains, some researchers now suspect that frequent use of such drugs may pose a hidden danger: While the rush of blood relieves chest pain, it also creates free radicals, chemically reactive molecular fragments that often contain oxygen.
Dilators are used when an endoscopy demonstrates the narrowing of the esophagus.
TEP dilators are then passed under direct vision through the puncture and into the esophagus (figure 5, C).
The dilator, tentatively referred to as BreatheRight(TM), is a disposable device that is intended to perform the same function as dilators presently being sold which must be placed inside the nostrils to reduce the work of nasal breathing.