dilator


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dilator

 [di-la´ter]
a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr), This abridgment of dilatator is not correct Latin and is not recognized in TA.
1. An instrument designed to enlarge a hollow structure or opening.
See also: bougie.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
See also: bougie.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
See also: bougie.
Synonym(s): dilatator

dilator

/di·la·tor/ (di-lāt´er)
1. a structure that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator

(dī-lā′tər, dī′lā′-, dĭ-lā′-)
n.
1. A muscle that dilates a body part, such as a blood vessel or the pupil of the eye.
2. An instrument that dilates a body part, such as a cavity, canal, or orifice.

dilator

[dī′lātər]
Etymology: L, dilatare, to widen
a device for expanding a body opening or cavity. Examples include a tent dilator, consisting of a sponge or bundle of seaweed that expands the cervical os, and a Barnes' bag (dilator), a rubber bag that can be inserted into a body cavity and filled with water to produce pressure on the cavity walls.

dilator

Therapeutics A device used to stretch/enlarge an opening or tubular structure–eg, esophagus, to allow the passage of food. See Bougienage.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An instrument designed for enlarging a hollow structure or opening.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.

dilator

Any instrument used to widen or enlarge an opening, orifice or passage. Dilators are extensively used in surgery.

dilator

  1. a muscle whose contraction opens an aperture or orifice; an example is the dilator muscle of the eye.
  2. a drug whose effect is the expansion of a structure.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
See: dilatator.

dilator

a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator pupillae muscle
dilator muscle of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Precision inflation: The EZDilate balloon dilator is engineered to provide superior diameter accuracy without the need to over-inflate to reach target specification.
He concluded from these results that 1) upper airway patency is possible even in the absence of dilator muscle activity meaning that these muscles are not the only factor in upper airway collapse and 2) thoracic forces which pull on the trachea play a role in upper airway patency.
One patient in the control group demanded to know the type of dilator used at Month 1 into the study and thus was excluded from further data collection.
The Flexor Parallel has a slit on the dilator that guides the wire outside of the sheath.
When the dilator was removed, there was "plenty of room for a finger to pass through the endocervical canal," he explained.
They range from ear-plugs for you to a nasal dilator for your noisy partner.
The patent covers the use of various topical formulations for treating wounds, ulcers, and inflammatory conditions, including topical formulations comprising a combination of the retinoid Vitamin A and the blood vessel dilator methyl nicotinate in a stable emulsion and topical formulations comprising a combination of a retinoid and the blood vessel dilators methyl nicotinate and arginine.
Food and Drug Administration has cleared an expanded use indication for the CRE (TM) Wireguided Balloon Dilator for endoscopic dilation of the Sphincter of Oddi following sphincterotomy.
The focus of the new work, the substance called asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), works by inhibiting production of a blood vessel dilator, nitric oxide.
Sexual intercourse and dilator use can lengthen the vagina.
The bronchial dilator was OK'd for use in training but not in racing.