dilate

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dilate

 [di´lāt]
to stretch an opening or hollow structure beyond its normal dimensions.

di·late

(dī'lāt), Avoid the mispronunciation dī'ă-lāt.
To perform or undergo dilation.

dilate

/di·late/ (di´lāt) to stretch an opening or hollow structure beyond its normal dimensions.

dilate

[dī′lāt]
to cause a physiological increase in the diameter of a body opening, blood vessel, or tube, such as the widening of the pupil of the eye in response to decreased light or the widening of the uterine cervix during labor.

dilate

verb To stretch or enlarge a tubular structure—e.g., a duct or artery, or a hollow viscus.

di·late

(dī'lāt)
To perform or undergo dilation.

Dilate

To enlarge, open wide, or distend.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dilating blood vessels opened somewhat less when a smoker wore the patch.
This quick breakdown of nitric oxide is imperative to prevent the gas from migrating to places where it might have unintended consequences, such as dilating blood vessels, says Keefer.
When deployed in the vessel, this mesh forms a scaffold with many openings for blood flow, while at the same time providing significant radial dilating force.
If inhaled-nitric oxide therapy has effects other than dilating blood vessels in the lungs, they must be due to mechanisms that run counter to classical understandings of the compound's action, Gladwin says.
Minoxidil also reverses balding because of the coincidental role of nitric oxide in hair growth, and not because of dilating blood vessels, he says.
Prostacyclin hinders blood clotting and relieves high blood pressure by dilating blood vessels.
These tiny incisions facilitate maximal dilation of the artery and lesion with the least amount of dilating force, minimizing trauma to the artery.
For example, a 1991 German study showed that treatment with L-arginine restored the dilating ability of blood vessels in patients with high cholesterol.
For one thing, they can expand to accommodate heavy flow, dilating like elastic tubing.
As people age, their vessels lose some dilating ability.