dilatation

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dilatation

 [dil″ah-ta´shun]
1. the condition, as of an orifice or tubular structure, of being dilated or stretched beyond normal dimensions by medications or instrumentation.
2. the act of dilating or stretching.
dilatation of the heart compensatory enlargement of the cavities of the heart, with thinning of the walls.

di·la·tion

(dī-lā'shŭn),
1. Physiologic or artificial enlargement of a hollow structure or opening.
2. The act of stretching or enlarging an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
Synonym(s): dilatation
[L. dilato, pp. dilatatus, to spread out, dilate]

dilatation

/dil·a·ta·tion/ (dil″ah-ta´shun)
1. the condition, as of an orifice or tubular structure, of being dilated or stretched beyond normal dimensions.
2. the act of dilating or stretching.

dilatation of the heart  compensatory enlargement of the cavities of the heart, with thinning of its walls.
segmental dilatation  dilatation of a portion of a tubular structure, such as the intestine, the segments on either side of the dilatation being of normal caliber.

dilatation

(dĭl′ə-tā′shən, dī′lə-)
n.
Dilation.

dil′a·ta′tion·al adj.

dilatation

See dilation.

dilatation

Widening. This may be a normal process or may imply stretching beyond normal dimensions, either as part of a disease process or as a deliberate surgical act.

dilatation

pathological or artificial enlargement of a blood vessel

di·la·tion

, dilatation (dī-lā'shŭn, dil'ă-tā'shŭn)
1. Physiologic or artificial enlargement of a hollow structure or opening.
2. Stretching an opening of a hollow structure.

dilatation, dilation

1. the condition, as of an orifice or tubular structure, of being dilated or stretched beyond normal dimensions.
2. the act of dilating or stretching. See under anatomical location, e.g. esophageal, cardiac, intestinal, gastric, pupillary.

dilatation-torsion syndrome
see gastric dilatation-volvulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
perpendicular to]] and the gradient of the volume dilatation [[epsilon].
The longitudinal dilatation wave behaves as a particle and goes through one of the slits, even as it follows the interference pattern dictated by the transverse distortion wave, as observed experimentally [20, see in particular Figure 4] and as seen in the coupling between [[epsilon]~.
The transverse distortion wave generates the interference pattern, while the longitudinal wave's dilatation (particle) follows a specific action, with its final location guided by the transverse wave's interference pattern.
However, in STCED the particle is not a singularity of the wave, but is instead characterized by its mass which arises from the volume dilatation propagating as part of the longitudinal wave.
7]-is linear thermal dilatation of spiral filament from WTh; [DELTA][L.
This method assures a growing of cathode reliability by correlation of linear thermal dilatation coefficients of spiral filament from WTh and central core from Mo, such as the difference between operational linear thermal dilatation of filament and core to be minim.
This equation demonstrates that rest-mass energy density arises from the volume dilatation of the spacetime continuum.
The volume dilatation [epsilon] is defined as the change in volume per original volume [6, see pp.
The relation between the invariant volume dilatation e and the invariant rest-mass energy density is thus given by
As we noted in [1], this equation demonstrates that restmass energy density arises from the volume dilatation of the spacetime continuum.
mu]v] are decomposed into a deviation tensor (the distortion) and a scalar (the dilatation), the strain-stress relation then becomes separated into dilatation and distortion relations:
Making use of (16) and (6) into the dilatation relation (9), we obtain the longitudinal dilatation mass relation