dihydrocodeine


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dihydrocodeine

 [di-hi″dro-ko´dēn]
a synthetic opioid analgesic and antitussive.

dihydrocodeine

/di·hy·dro·co·deine/ (di-hi″dro-ko´dēn) an opioid analgesic and antitussive; used as the acid tartrate for the relief of moderate to moderately severe pain; administered orally.

dihydrocodeine

A painkilling drug. Brand names are DF118, DHC Continus and, in conjunction with PARACETAMOL, Remedeine.

dihydrocodeine

narcotic analgesic derived from, and of similar potency to, codeine

dihydrocodeine

an opioid analgesic and antitussive.
References in periodicals archive ?
But it doesn't seem to me there is any place for you within the nursing profession because unfortunately you have if not an addiction, a very high dependency on dihydrocodeine.
I've spoken to people who got hooked on heroin because they would take that when they couldn't get dihydrocodeine as it had a similar effect.
Dr June Raine, director of medicines post licensing at the MHRA, said: "Analgesics that contain codeine and dihydrocodeine play a very important part in the treatment of pain.
I took Diclofenac and Dihydrocodeine for three months, then Arthrotec and paracetamol.
Several years later Smith was charged with Amy's murder when it emerged that the powerful adult painkiller dihydrocodeine was discovered in her blood after a post-mortem examination to determine the cause of death.
Armani has to take dihydrocodeine every four hours as paracetamol would alter her temperature.
In May 2009, the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee added buprenorphine to the pharmaceutical schedule which already included codeine, dihydrocodeine, fentanyl, methadone, morphine, oxycodone and pethidine (9).
A post-mortem found high levels of prescription drugs in her body, and pathologist Dr Brian Rogers concluded she died from dihydrocodeine, codeine and citalopram poisoning.
The medic prescribed dihydrocodeine, a heroin-like substance, and the antihistamine cyclizine by using fake identities.
After she managed to escape from their flat, she returned to activate an alarm and found Ellis with dihydrocodeine pills.
Family GP Hung Kor used patient details to make scripts for batches of powerful dihydrocodeine tablets then kept them all for his own habit.
GP Hung Kor, who had surgeries on South Tyneside, spent eight years signing off the bogus scripts for batches of Dihydrocodeine, it was claimed.