diglossia


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tongue

 [tung]
a muscular organ on the floor of the mouth; it aids in chewing, swallowing, and speech, and is the location of organs of taste. The taste buds are located in the papillae, which are projections on the upper surface of the tongue. The condition of the tongue can sometimes be a guide to the general condition of the body. glossitis (inflammation of the tongue) can accompany anemia, scarlet fever, nutritional deficiencies, and most general infections. Sometimes it is part of an adverse reaction to medication. One form of glossitis causes a smooth tongue, with a red, glazed appearance. A coated or furry tongue may be present in a variety of illnesses, but does not necessarily indicate illness. A dry tongue sometimes indicates insufficiency of fluids in the body, or it may result from fever. When the tongue is extremely dry and has a leathery appearance, the cause may be uremia.
The tongue, showing principal structures. From Dorland's, 2000.
bifid tongue a tongue with a lengthwise cleft.
black tongue (black hairy tongue) hairy tongue in which the hypertrophied filiform papillae are brown or black; called also lingua nigra, melanoglossia, and nigrities linguae.
cleft tongue bifid tongue.
coated tongue one covered with a white or yellow layer of desquamated epithelium, debris, bacteria, fungi, or other material.
fissured tongue (furrowed tongue) a tongue with numerous furrows or grooves on the dorsal surface, often radiating from a groove on the midline.
geographic tongue a tongue with denuded patches, surrounded by thickened epithelium.
hairy tongue a benign condition of the tongue characterized by hypertrophy of the filiform papillae that gives the dorsum of the tongue a furry appearance. The color of the elongated papillae varies from yellowish white to brown or black, depending upon staining by substances such as tobacco, foods, or drugs.
raspberry tongue a diffusely reddened and swollen, uncoated tongue, as seen several days after the onset of the rash in scarlet fever.
scrotal tongue fissured tongue.
strawberry tongue, red raspberry t.
strawberry tongue, white the white-coated tongue with prominent red papillae characteristic of the early stage of scarlet fever; the coating desquamates, leaving a beefy red (raspberry) tongue.

di·glos·si·a

(dī-glos'ē-ă),
A developmental condition that results in a longitudinal split in the tongue. See: bifid tongue.
[G. di-, two, + glōssa, tongue]

di·glos·si·a

(dī-glos'ē-ă)
A developmental defect that results in a longitudinal split in the tongue.
See also: bifid tongue
[G. di-, two, + glōssa, tongue]

di·glos·si·a

(dī-glos'ē-ă)
A developmental condition that results in a longitudinal split in tongue.
[G. di-, two, + glōssa, tongue]

diglossia

bifid tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diglossia partners with leading scholars and institutions to serve the needs of native Arabic, Chinese and Spanish speaking students around the world.
Jean-Paul Pazziani, on the other hand, provides an analysis of literary diglossia connected to the phenomenon of translation.
In the Basque context, normalization has perhaps created the sort of diglossia that Ferguson originally described, involving two or more varieties of the "same" language, (1) because of the relative artificiality of Batua--the standardized variety of Euskera which is taught in schools and used in formal communication--and the dialectal differences found throughout Euskal Herria.
Parkinson, 'VSO to SVO in Modern Standard Arabic: A Study in Diglossia Syntax', in Al-Arabiyya 14 (1981), pp.
The latter takes the form of a productive awareness of the "double-think" behind this melancholia, an awareness that challenges the authority of Pale/Fringe diglossia.
This phenomenon, called diglossia, is found everywhere that a grapholect has been elaborated, but Arabic is somewhat more complicated since two distinct varieties of the same language are used side by side in the same speech community, each having a set of specialized functions.
Educated spoken Arabic in Egypt and the Levant: A Critical review of diglossia and related concepts.
Translation makes me think about words unavailable in sixteenth-century English and about diglossia.
Sociolinguistic variation in Spoken Arabic in Egypt: a reexamination of the concept of diglossia.
All Arabic speakers share in the same diglossia that marks the Middle East, with a single Classical variety accepted for literacy and formal use, a large number of local vernaculars as spoken language, and a tendency to develop an educated standard version.
5) Commentaries on the diglossia issue and its impact on literary production in Egypt are too numerous in Arabic to cite, but one of the most useful, in its discussion of the colloquial as an element in the fashioning of an Arabic modernist outlook in Egyptian literature, is Ghali Shukri, "al-'Ammiyya fi al-shi'r al-misri al-hadith," al-Shi'r, 15:57 (January 1990), pp.
The term diglossia is used to distinguish societal from individual bilingualism (Ferguson 1959).