digitoxin


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digitoxin

 [dij″ĭ-tok´sin]
a cardiotonic glycoside obtained from Digitalis purpurea and other species of the same genus; used in the treatment of congestive heart failure. It has a slowly developing action and slow elimination. Parenteral solutions should be diluted when given intravenously.

dig·i·tox·in

(dij'i-tok'sin),
A cardioactive glycoside obtained from the leaves of Digitalis purpurea; it is more completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract than is digitalis. Largely eliminated by hepatic metabolism.

digitoxin

/dig·i·tox·in/ (-tok´sin) a cardiotonic glycoside from Digitalis purpurea and other Digitalis species; used similarly to digitalis.

digitoxin

(dĭj′ĭ-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
A highly active glycoside, C41H64O13, derived from digitalis and prescribed in the treatment of certain cardiac conditions.

digitoxin

[dij′itok′sin]
a cardiac glycoside obtained from leaves of Digitalis purpurea. Digitoxin differs in many ways from digoxin, including having a far greater half-life and a different route of elimination.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of congestive heart failure and certain cardiac arrhythmias.
contraindications Ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects The most serious adverse reactions are cardiac arrhythmias and heart block, disorientation, and visual disturbances.

digitoxin

Cardiology A cardiac glycoside used like digoxin, which binds more strongly to proteins, but for a similar pharmacologic effect, requires a 10-fold greater concentration

dig·i·tox·in

(dij'i-tok'sin)
A cardioactive glycoside obtained from the leaves of Digitalis purpurea; it is more completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract than is digitalis. Also called crystalline digitalin.

digitoxin

a poisonous glycoside contained in digitalis, an extract from the foxglove; it is a powerful heart stimulant.

digitoxin

(dij´itok´sin),
n brand names: Crystodigin, Digitaline;
drug class: cardia glycoside;
action: inhibits the formation of sodium-potassium ATPase, which makes more calcium available for contractile proteins;
uses: congestive heart failure (CHF), atrial fibrillation, paroxysmal atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia.

digitoxin

a cardiotonic glycoside obtained from Digitalis purpurea and other species of the same genus; used in the treatment of congestive heart failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The serum concentrations of digitoxin (but not digoxin) can be predicted from daily intake of the drug related to body weight [11].
Even today, no more effective drug for treating heart failure exists than digitalis, although we now call its active constituents digoxin and digitoxin.
Rifampin may also reduce digoxin plasma concentrations, but the magnitude of the effect appears less since renal elimination is more important for digoxin than digitoxin.
digitoxin, morphine, and taxol), standardized extracts, herbal teas, and food plants; plant-derived remedies can contain chemicals with potent pharmacologic and toxicologic properties (2,3).
Digoxin and digitoxin, two such inotropic agents, were found to be oxidized, in in vitro experiments, by alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol (Frey and Vallee, 1979).
The hospitalizations involved episodes of congestive heart failure, hypertension management, digitoxin toxicity, pericarditis, and myocardial infarction.
From the deadly nightshade comes atropin, a drug important in ophthamology, and derived from the foxglove plant is digitoxin, or digitalis, the necessary ingredient in several heart medications.
Molecules with similar structures include cardenolides, such as digoxin and digitoxin, which are known substrates of ABC transporters (de Lan noy and Silverman 1992; Cavet et al.
Verglcichende Studien uber Wirkungen eines Crataegus-Extraktes, ven Digitoxin, Dikgoxin and y-Strophanthin am isolierten Warmbluterherzen.
cardiac glycosides: Steroid glycosides that have stimulative effects on the heart, for example digitoxin, digoxin, and gitoxin from the foxglove (Digitalis spp.
His regular medications were digitoxin, isosorbid-5-mononitrate, allopurinol, ranitidine, flavonoid, diosmin and phenprocoumon.
Stability of digoxin and digitoxin in specimens collected in blood collection tubes containing serum separator gels.