digestion

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digestion

 [dĭ-jes´chun]
1. the subjection of a substance to prolonged heat and moisture, so as to soften and disintegrate it.
2. the act or process of converting food into chemical substances that can be absorbed into the blood and utilized by the body tissue.
 Digestion. 1. Carbohydrates: principally starches, lactose, and sucrose. Starches are acted on by the enzyme ptyalin (alpha-amylase) secreted in saliva, by hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach, and by pancreatic amylase and intestinal amylase in the small intestine, which split the starches into maltose and isomaltose. These, in turn, are acted on by maltase and isomaltase and split into two molecules of glucose. Lactose is split by the enzyme lactase into a molecule of galactose and a molecule of glucose. The monosaccharides glucose, galactose, and fructose are absorbed from the small intestine into the blood. 2. Fats: emulsified by bile salts and agitation. The emulsified fats are acted upon by pancreatic and enteric lipase to form fatty acids, glycerol, and monoglycerides, which are absorbed through the intestinal walls. Small quantities of diglycerides and triglycerides are also absorbed. 3. Proteins: acted on chiefly in the stomach by pepsin, which splits proteins into proteoses, peptones, and polypeptides. In the small intestine they are acted on by the pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and carboxypeptidase to form polypeptides and amino acids. In the small intestine the peptidases complete the breakdown of the peptides into dipeptides and amino acids. Almost all proteins are eventually digested and absorbed either as amino acids or as dipeptides or tripeptides.
See illustration. Digestion is accomplished by physically breaking down, churning, diluting, and dissolving the food substances, and also by splitting them chemically into simpler compounds. Carbohydrates are eventually broken down to monosaccharides (simple sugars); proteins are broken down into amino acids; and fats are absorbed as fatty acids and glycerol (glycerin). The digestive process takes place in the alimentary canal or digestive system. The salivary glands, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas are located outside the alimentary canal, but they are considered accessory organs of digestion because their secretions provide essential enzymes.
gastric digestion digestion by the action of gastric juice.
digestion/hydration in the omaha system, a client problem defined as converting food into substances suitable for absorption and assimilation into the body and supplying water to maintain adequate body fluids.
intestinal digestion digestion by the action of intestinal juices.
pancreatic digestion digestion by the action of pancreatic juice.
peptic digestion gastric digestion.
primary digestion digestion occurring in the gastrointestinal tract.
salivary digestion the change of starch into maltose by the saliva.

di·ges·tion

(di-jes'chŭn, dī-),
1. The process of making a digest.
2. The mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic process whereby ingested food is converted into material suitable for assimilation for synthesis of tissues or liberation of energy.
[L. digestio. See digest]

digestion

/di·ges·tion/ (di-jes´chun)
1. the act or process of converting food into chemical substances that can be absorbed and assimilated.
2. the subjection of a substance to prolonged heat and moisture, so as to disintegrate and soften it.diges´tive

artificial digestion  digestion outside the body.
gastric digestion  digestion by gastric juice.
gastrointestinal digestion  the gastric and intestinal digestions together.
intestinal digestion  digestion by intestinal juices.
pancreatic digestion  digestion by pancreatic juice in the duodenum.
salivary digestion  the change of starch into maltose by the saliva.

digestion

(dī-jĕs′chən, dĭ-)
n.
1.
a. The process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed and assimilated by a living organism. In most animals it is accomplished in the digestive tract by the mechanical and enzymatic breakdown of foods into simpler chemical compounds.
b. The ability to digest food.
2. Biochemistry The process of decomposing complex organic substances into simpler substances, as by the action of enzymes or bacteria.
3. Chemistry The process of softening or disintegrating by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.

digestion

[dijes′chən]
Etymology: L, digerere, to break down
the conversion of food into absorbable substances in the GI tract. Digestion is accomplished through the mechanical and chemical breakdown of food into smaller and smaller molecules, with the help of glands located both inside and outside the gut. digestive, adj.

di·ges·tion

(di-jes'chŭn)
The mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic process whereby ingested food is converted into material suitable for assimilation for synthesis of tissues or liberation of energy.

digestion

The conversion of food into a form suitable for absorption and use by the body. This involves both mechanical reduction to a finer consistency and chemical breakdown to simpler substances.

digestion

a process in which food is broken down into a form that can be utilized. It usually consists of two elements:
  1. a mechanical/physical stage, e.g. mastication, churning, emulsification, in which no chemical bonds are broken and no enzymes are required; and
  2. a chemical stage requiring enzymes in which complex food molecules are broken down by HYDROLYSIS into a state in which they can be absorbed. In most heterotrophic organisms digestion is ‘extracellular’, the enzymes being released outside the cell and the digested products absorbed. In organisms such as the fungi, digestion takes place in the external environment, but in the majority of HETEROTROPHS digestion takes place in a specialized cavity or internal tube, the ALIMENTARY CANAL, which is usually muscular, with food being squeezed through the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM by a process of PERISTALSIS. Primitive animals carry out intracellular digestion, food particles being taken into food vacuoles within the cell and digested there.

Digestion

The mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic process in which food is converted into the materials suitable for use by the body.

digestion

the processes which break down ingested food to substances that are absorbed from the alimentary canal into the blood or lymph. Catalysed by the digestive enzymes in the saliva, gastric juice, pancreatic juice and those secreted from the lining of the small intestine. These 'juices' together add up to a total of about 10 litres per day entering the gut. Apart from those that occur in the lumen of the gut, some further digestive processes are effected by the enterocytes, the cells in the lining of the small intestine. Depends also on other chemical processes, including for example emulsification of fats by bile from the liver.

di·ges·tion

(di-jes'chŭn)
Mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic process whereby ingested food is converted into material suitable for assimilation for synthesis of tissues.

digestion,

n the conversion of food into absorbable substances in the GI tract.

digestion

1. the act or process of converting food into chemical substances that can be absorbed into the blood and utilized by the body tissues.
2. the subjection of a substance to prolonged heat and moisture, so as to disintegrate and soften it.
Digestion is accomplished by physically breaking down, churning, diluting and dissolving the food substances, and also by splitting them chemically into simpler compounds. Carbohydrates are eventually broken down to monosaccharides (simple sugars); proteins are broken down into amino acids; and fats are absorbed as fatty acids, monoglycerides and glycerol (glycerin).
The digestive process takes place in the alimentary canal or digestive system. The salivary glands, liver, gallbladder and pancreas are located outside the alimentary canal, but they are considered accessory organs of digestion because their secretions provide essential enzymes and other substances.

avian digestion
differs markedly from mammals in the mouth; there are no teeth, dental functions being performed by the beak and the muscular gizzard; the esophagus, in other than owls and insectivorous species, has one or two crops, dilations where ingesta are held temporarily.
enzymatic digestion
most digestive processes in monogastric animals are enzymatic brought about by enzymes secreted into the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract and enzymes located at the brush borders of the intestinal epithelium.
digestion error
any disruption of the normal digestive process; caused by abnormal ingesta, either chemically or physically, or by an error in the physiological and biochemical processes which constitute digestion.
gastric digestion
digestion by the action of gastric juice.
impaired digestion
intestinal digestion
digestion by the action of intestinal juices, bile and pancreatic juice.
luminal phase digestion
the stage of the digestion of fats that goes on in the lumen of the intestine; as distinct from the mucosal phase that occurs in the epithelial cells.
pancreatic digestion
digestion by the action of pancreatic juice.
peptic digestion
gastric digestion by pepsin.
primary digestion
digestion occurring in the gastrointestinal tract.
ruminant digestion
characterized by the fermentative functions that are carried on in the forestomachs. Cellulose is readily digested with the output of short-chain fatty acids being the chief energy source for the animal. Nonprotein nitrogen is utilized by the ruminal bacteria for the manufacture of protein which is later available for the satisfaction of the animal's protein needs.
salivary digestion
the change of starch into maltose by the saliva; most marked in humans.
digestion tests
see starch digestion test, lactose digestion test, gelatin digestion test.

Patient discussion about digestion

Q. My aunt suffered from digestive disorder a few months back. My aunt suffered from digestive disorder a few months back. First we were told that this symptom reveal that she is suffering from fibromyalgia. Later another doctor diagnosed her and said that she is not affected by fibromyalgia. So we like to know actually what is fibromyalgia sometimes mistaken for?

A. I have received similar questions from many of my friends so you are not the first person to have such question, so don’t worry. Usually fibromyalgia is initially mistaken for several other conditions, including Lyme disease, lupus, depression and rheumatoid arthritis to name just a few illnesses. Other conditions for which fibromyalgia is occasionally mistaken include digestive disorders, sleep disorders and thyroid problems. Often, it is because the various symptoms of fibromyalgia are so similar to the symptoms of other disorders that many FMS patients do not receive a proper diagnosis for many years. And this is also why it is especially critical to be seen by either a rheumatologist or a pain specialist to ensure a proper diagnosis, and to rule out other conditions.

Q. It feels like I cannot breath properly, my chest feels heavy and Whenever i eats something it gets even more. If i don't eat much i get gases problem. I am regularly having constipation if i don't take proper medicine. Mostly i have been diagnosed as Digestive System problem, stomach problem, dryness in body and no Problem with my breathing system just cause of gases which causes my chest to remain heavy. I am worried because i never gets my real power in breathing and my digestive system is not getting well. Kindly suggest.

A. I take milk regularly have no problem with it nor with any specific food or i have never tried to look at this aspect. However i do feel stomach problem with foods heavy for stomach like burger or too much oily things..

Q. What is the connection between Acid Reflux and Autism? I heard about a digestive issue called Acid reflux. Some people say that this is related to Autism. What is the connection between Acid Reflux and Autism?

More discussions about digestion