digenetic

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Related to digenetic trematodes: Mehlis gland

digenetic

 [di-jĕ-net´ik]
having two stages of multiplication, one sexual in the mature forms, the other asexual in the larval stages.

di·ge·net·ic

(dī'jĕ-net'ik),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by digenesis. Synonym(s): heteroxenous
2. Pertaining to the digenetic fluke.

digenetic

/di·ge·net·ic/ (di″jah-net´ik) having two stages of multiplication, one sexual in the mature forms, the other asexual in the larval stages.

digenetic

(dī′jə-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Having two or more hosts through the course of the life cycle, as in some parasites, such as trematodes.

di·ge·net·ic

(dī'jĕ-net'ik)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by digenesis.
Synonym(s): heteroxenous.
2. Pertaining to the digenetic fluke.

digenetic

(of an organism such as a parasite) requiring an alternation of hosts.

digenetic

1. having two stages of multiplication, one sexual in the mature forms, the other asexual in the larval stages.
2. belonging to the subclass of flukes Digenea.

digenetic trematodes
see digenea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using standard techniques for digenetic trematodes, then examined at different accelerating voltages (5-10 kV) and working distances, using a Leica Stereoscan 420 SEM.
Three digenetic trematodes of Clarias mossambicus Peters (Clariidae) from Ethiopia.
Life cycle of Coitocaecum anaspidis Hickman, a New Zealand digenetic trematode.
Synopsis of the digenetic trematodes of vertebrates.
Digenetic trematodes have complex life cycles in which bivalves are intermediate hosts that harbor larval stages, and carnivorous fish are the definitive hosts.
a digenetic trematode, and a turbellarian were confirmed in the histological preparations of the blood cockle, A.
2%) was found infested with an undescribed digenetic trematode.
Digenetic trematodes in the family Echinostomatidae use gastropod and bivalve molluscs as intermediate hosts and have a worldwide distribution (Lauckner 1983).
The term "progenetic" is applied to sexually mature, ovigerous digenetic trematodes occurring in invertebrates (Aitken-Ander & Levin 1985) which, instead of using a definitive vertebrate host, can abbreviate its life cycle by maturing and completing its life cycle in a single molluscan host.
33%) of parasitic infection by digenetic trematodes resulting in castration was also noted.