digastric


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digastric

 [di-gas´trik]
1. having two bellies.
2. digastric muscle; see anatomic Table of Muscles in the Appendices.

di·gas·tric

(dī-gas'trik),
1. Having two bellies; denoting especially a muscle with two fleshy parts separated by an intervening tendinous part. Synonym(s): biventral
2. Relating to the digastric muscle; denoting a fossa or groove with which it is in relation and a nerve supplying its posterior belly.
Synonym(s): digastricus (1)
[G. di-, two, + gastēr, belly]

digastric

/di·gas·tric/ (di-gas´trik)
1. having two bellies.
2. digastric muscle.

digastric

(dī-găs′trĭk) Anatomy
adj.
Having two fleshy ends connected by a thinner tendinous portion. Used of certain muscles.
n.
A muscle of the lower jaw that elevates the hyoid bone and assists in lowering the jaw.

di·gas·tric

(dī-gas'trik)
1. Having two bellies; denoting especially a muscle with two fleshy parts separated by an intervening tendinous part.
Synonym(s): biventral.
2. Relating to the digastric muscle; denoting a fossa or groove with which it is in relation and a nerve supplying its posterior belly.
See: digastric muscle
[G. di-, two, + gastēr, belly]

digastric

1. Of a muscle having two bellies connected by a thinner tendinous part.
2. A muscle that acts to open the mouth by moving the jaw bone (mandible) down.

digastric

  1. (of muscle) having two swollen parts, or bellies, interconnected by a tendon.
  2. a muscle concerned with the swallowing reflex in the human neck.

digastric

1. having two bellies.
2. digastric muscle. See Table 13.
References in periodicals archive ?
The temporalis muscle, the masseter muscle, and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle have all been used to produce voluntary facial movement in patients with facial nerve paralysis.
29) Terzis and Kalantarian advocated dynamic restoration of lip depressor function with a digastric and/or platysma muscle transfer.
However, the retromandibular vein is not always identified on CT or MRI, so two other methods can be employed: identification of the facial nerve line (a line joining the lateral surface of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and the lateral surface of the ascending ramus of the mandible) and identification of Stensen's duct.
The lesion presents as a mass in the upper to midlateral neck (jugular digastric lymph nodes) that has been present for an average of 5 months.
The lower part of the submandibular gland overlaps the digastric (posterior belly) and stylohyoid muscles.
The mylohyoid is sutured to the digastric fascia with absorbable sutures.
the branch to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle
By the middle of the fifth week (embryo length: 10 mm), the facial nerve gives off small branches to the posterior digastric premuscle mass.
the temporal, masseter, pterygoid, and mylohyoid muscles and the tensor of the tympanum, tensor of the velum palatinum, and the anterior belly of the digastric muscles) are supplied by the trigeminal nerve, the nerve of the mandibular arch.
The facial ridge was lowered inferiorly at the level of the digastric ridge to allow for unencumbered communication between the mastoid bowl and the meatus (figure 1).
5-cm infiltrative left parotid tumor with an extracapsular spread to the adjacent sternocleidomastoid and digastric muscles (figure 1 ).