fibrosis

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fibrosis

 [fi-bro´sis]
formation of fibrous tissue; see also fibroid degeneration. adj., adj fibrot´ic.
congenital hepatic fibrosis a developmental disorder of the liver, marked by formation of irregular broad bands of fibrous tissue containing multiple cysts formed by disordered terminal bile ducts, resulting in vascular constriction and portal hypertension.
cystic fibrosis (cystic fibrosis of pancreas) see cystic fibrosis.
diffuse idiopathic interstitial fibrosis (diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis) idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
endomyocardial fibrosis an idiopathic type of myocardiopathy that is endemic in various parts of Africa and rarely in other areas, characterized by cardiomegaly, marked thickening of the endocardium with dense white fibrous tissue that may extend to involve the inner myocardium, and by congestive heart failure.
idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis chronic inflammatory progressive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with steadily progressive dyspnea, resulting in death from oxygen lack or right heart failure. Most cases are of unknown origin, although some are thought to result from pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, scleroderma, and other diseases.
mediastinal fibrosis development of hard white fibrous tissue in the upper portion of the mediastinum, sometimes obstructing the air passages and large blood vessels; called also fibrosing or fibrous mediastinitis.
periureteral fibrosis retroperitoneal fibrosis.
pleural fibrosis fibrosis of the visceral pleura so that part or all of a lung becomes covered with a plaque or a thick layer of nonexpansible fibrous tissue. The more extensive form is called fibrothorax.
postfibrinous fibrosis that occurring in tissues in which fibrin has been deposited.
proliferative fibrosis that in which the fibrous elements continue to proliferate after the original causative factor has ceased to operate.
pulmonary fibrosis idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
retroperitoneal fibrosis deposition of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal space, producing vague abdominal discomfort, and often causing blockage of the ureters, with resultant hydronephrosis and impaired renal function, which may result in renal failure. Called also Ormond disease.
fibrosis u´teri a morbid condition characterized by overgrowth of the smooth muscle and increase in the collagenous fibrous tissue of the uterus, producing a thickened, coarse, tough myometrium.

fi·bro·sis

(fī-brō'sis),
Formation of fibrous tissue as a reparative or reactive process, as opposed to formation of fibrous tissue as a normal constituent of an organ or tissue.

fibrosis

/fi·bro·sis/ (fi-bro´sis) formation of fibrous tissue.fibrot´ic
congenital hepatic fibrosis  a developmental disorder of the liver marked by formation of irregular broad bands of fibrous tissue containing multiple cysts formed by disordered terminal bile ducts, resulting in vascular constriction and portal hypertension.
cystic fibrosis , cystic fibrosis of the pancreas a generalized hereditary disorder of infants, children, and young adults, with widespread dysfunction of exocrine glands, signs of chronic pulmonary disease, obstruction of pancreatic ducts by eosinophilic concretions and consequent pancreatic enzyme deficiency, and other symptoms.
endomyocardial fibrosis  idiopathic myocardiopathy seen endemically in parts of Africa and less often in other areas, characterized by cardiomegaly, thickening of the endocardium with dense, white fibrous tissue that often extends to involve the inner third or half of the myocardium, and congestive heart failure.
idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis  chronic inflammation and progessive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with progressive dyspnea and potentially fatal lack of oxygen or right heart failure. The acute form is called Hamman-Rich syndrome.
mediastinal fibrosis  fibrous mediastinitis; development of white, hard fibrous tissue in the upper portion of the mediastinum, sometimes obstructing the air passages and large blood vessels.
nodular subepidermal fibrosis 
2. a type of benign fibrous histiocytoma marked by subepidermal formation of fibrous nodules as a result of productive inflammation.
pleural fibrosis  fibrosis of the visceral pleura so that part or all of a lung becomes covered with a thick layer of nonexpansible fibrous tissue; fibrothorax is a more extensive form.

fibrosis

(fī-brō′sĭs)
n.
The formation of excessive fibrous tissue, as in a reparative or reactive process.

fi·brot′ic (-brŏt′ĭk) adj.

fibrosis

[fībrō′sis]
Etymology: L, fibra + Gk, osis, condition
1 a proliferation of fibrous connective tissue that occurs normally in the formation of scar tissue to replace tissue lost through injury or infection.
2 an abnormal condition in which fibrous connective tissue spreads over or replaces normal smooth muscle or other normal organ tissue. Fibrosis is most common in the heart, lung, peritoneum, and kidney. See also cystic fibrosis, fibromyalgia.

fibrosis

Medtalk A proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrous tissue. See Bridging fibrosis, Hepatic fibrosis, Idiopathic interstitial fibrosis of lung, Pipestem fibrosis, Radiation fibrosis, Stellate fibrosis, Systemic idiopathic fibrosis.

fi·bro·sis

(fī-brō'sis)
Formation of fibrous tissue as a reparative or reactive process, as opposed to formation of fibrous tissue as a normal constituent of an organ or tissue.

fibrosis

Scarring and thickening of any tissue or organ by the replacement of the original structure by simple collagenous FIBROUS TISSUE. This usually follows injury or inflammation. Fibrosis is the body's main healing process and the scar tissue formed is usually strong.

Fibrosis

Formation of fibrous tissue as a reaction or as a repair process; may occur due to treatment and/or disease. in lymphedema condition known as hardening of the limb with resulting restriction of circulatory flow, increased infection, and weeping sores.

fi·bro·sis

(fī-brō'sis)
Formation of fibrous tissue as a reparative or reactive process, as opposed to formation of fibrous tissue as a normal constituent of an organ or tissue.

fibrosis (fībrō´sis),

n 1. the process of forming fibrous tissue, usually by degeneration (e.g., fibrosis of the pulp). The process occurs normally in the formation of scar tissue to replace normal tissue lost through injury or infection.
2. an abnormal condition in which fibrous connective tissue spreads over or replaces normal smooth muscle or other normal organ tissue. Fibrosis is most common in the heart, lung, peritoneum, and kidney.
fibrosis, diffuse hereditary gingival,
n an uncommon form of severe gingival hyperplasia considered to be of genetic origin. The tissue is pink, firm, dense, and insensitive and has little tendency to bleed.
fibrosis, hereditary gingival,
n an uncommon form of severe gingival hyperplasia that may begin with the eruption of the deciduous or permanent teeth and is characterized by a firm, dense, pink gingival tissue with little tendency toward bleeding.

fibrosis

formation of fibrous tissue; fibroid degeneration.

postfibrinous fibrosis
that occurring in tissues in which fibrin has been previously deposited.
proliferative fibrosis
that in which the fibrous elements continue to proliferate after the original causative factor has ceased to operate.

Patient discussion about fibrosis

Q. Can cystic fibrosis patients have children? My boyfriend has cystic fibrosis, and currently he’s treated with many medications but usually healthy (other than pneumonia from hospitalization from time to time). I heard that men with cystic fibrosis can’t have children - is that true? Is there anything he can do about it?

A. WE ARE A HEALTHY COUPLE BUT MY WIFE NEVER GET PREGNANT IN 20 YEARS OF RELATIONSHIP.
I'M SO SORRY ABOUT MY ENGLISH, I'M LEARNING.

Q. Do women with cystic fibrosis have difficult pregnancy? My wife has cystic fibrosis, and after 3 year of marriage we decided we want a baby. I know that men with cystic fibrosis are usually infertile and can’t have children- is that the case also for women with cystic fibrosis? Is the pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis more problematic? Is it dangerous?

A. Before you attempt a pregnancy, you should consult her doctor to make sure she can tolerate it, because very severe disease can make the pregnancy dangerous for her. If her disease isn’t so severe, usually there are no special problems.

Q. my uncle was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis. can anyone help?

A. Pulmonary Fibrosis involves scarring of the lung. Gradually, the air sacs of the lungs become replaced by fibrotic tissue. When the scar forms, the tissue becomes thicker causing an irreversible loss of the tissue’s ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream. Traditional theories have postulated that it might be an autoimmune disorder, or the after effects of an infection, viral in nature. There is a growing body of evidence which points to a genetic predisposition. A mutation in the SP-C protein has been found to exist in families with a history of Pulmonary Fibrosis. The most current thinking is that the fibrotic process is a reaction to microscopic injury to the lung. While the exact cause remains unknown, associations have been made with the following:*Inhaled environmental and occupational pollutants, *Cigarette smoking, *Diseases such as Scleroderma, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus,*Therapeutic radiation. For full: http://www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org/ipf.htm Hope this helps.

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