sclerosis

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sclerosis

 [sklĕ-ro´sis]
an induration or hardening, especially of a part from inflammation, or in disease of the interstitial substance. The term is used chiefly for such a hardening of the nervous system due to hyperplasia of the connective tissue or for hardening of the blood vessels. Called also induration. adj., adj sclerot´ic.
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis see amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
arteriolar sclerosis arteriolosclerosis.
disseminated sclerosis multiple sclerosis.
familial centrolobar sclerosis a progressive familial form of leukoencephalopathy marked by nystagmus, ataxia, tremor, parkinsonian facies, dysarthria, and mental deterioration.
focal glomerular sclerosis focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.
glomerular sclerosis glomerulosclerosis.
hippocampal sclerosis loss of neurons in the region of the hippocampus, with gliosis; sometimes seen in epilepsy.
lateral sclerosis a form seated in the lateral columns of the spinal cord. It may be primary, with spastic paraplegia, rigidity of the limbs, and increase of the tendon reflexes but no sensory disturbances, or secondary to myelitis, with paraplegia and sensory disturbance.
medial calcific sclerosis (Mönckeberg's sclerosis) Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis.
multiple sclerosis see multiple sclerosis.
systemic sclerosis systemic scleroderma.
tuberous sclerosis a congenital heredofamilial disease, transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, characterized principally by the presence of hamartomas of the brain (tubers), retina (phakomas), and viscera, mental retardation, seizures, and adenoma sebaceum, and often associated with other skin lesions.

scle·ro·sis

, pl.

scle·ro·ses

(sklē-rō'sis, -sēz), Do not confuse this word with cirrhosis or serosa.
1. Synonym(s): induration (2)
2. In neuropathy, induration of nervous and other structures by a hyperplasia of the interstitial fibrous or glial connective tissue.
[G. sklērōsis, hardness]

sclerosis

/scle·ro·sis/ (-ro´sis) an induration or hardening, especially from inflammation and in diseases of the interstitial substance; applied chiefly to such hardening of the nervous system or to hardening of the blood vessels.
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  Lou Gehrig disease: progressive degeneration of the neurons that give rise to the corticospinal tract and of the motor cells of the brain stem and spinal cord, resulting in a deficit of upper and lower motor neurons; it usually has a fatal outcome within 2 to 3 years.
arterial sclerosis  arteriosclerosis.
arteriolar sclerosis  arteriolosclerosis.
diffuse cerebral sclerosis  the infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy.
disseminated sclerosis  multiple s.
familial centrolobar sclerosis  Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.
glomerular sclerosis  glomerulosclerosis.
hippocampal sclerosis  loss of neurons in the region of the hippocampus, with gliosis; sometimes seen in epilepsy.
lateral sclerosis  degeneration of the lateral columns of the spinal cord, leading to spastic paraplegia. See amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and primary lateral sclerosis
Mönckeberg's sclerosis  see under arteriosclerosis.
multiple sclerosis  (MS) demyelination occurring in patches throughout the white matter of the central nervous system, sometimes extending into the gray matter; symptoms of lesions of the white matter are weakness, incoordination, paresthesias, speech disturbances, and visual complaints.
primary lateral sclerosis  a form of motor neuron disease in which the degenerative process is limited to the corticospinal pathways.
progressive systemic sclerosis  systemic scleroderma.
tuberous sclerosis  an autosomal dominant disease characterized by hamartomas of the brain (tubers), retina, and viscera; mental retardation; seizures; and adenoma sebaceum.

sclerosis

(sklə-rō′sĭs)
n. pl. sclero·ses (-sēz)
1.
a. A thickening or hardening of a body part, as of an artery, especially from excessive formation of fibrous interstitial tissue.
b. A disease characterized by this thickening or hardening.
2. Botany The hardening of cells by the formation of a secondary wall and the deposition of lignin.

sclerosis

[sklirō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, skleros, hard
a condition characterized by hardening of tissue resulting from any of several causes, including inflammation, the deposit of mineral salts, and infiltration of connective tissue fibers. sclerotic, adj.

sclerosis

Medtalk Induration of tissue. See Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Diffuse mesangial sclerosis, End plate sclerosis, Lichen sclerosis, Mesial temporal sclerosis, Multiple sclerosis, Nephrosclerosis sclerosis, Progressive systemic sclerosis, Systemic sclerosis.

scle·ro·sis

, pl. scleroses (skler-ōsis, -sēz)
1. Synonym(s): induration (2) .
2. In neuropathy, induration of nervous and other structures by a hyperplasia of the interstitial fibrous or glial connective tissue.
[G. sklērōsis, hardness]

sclerosis

Hardening of tissues usually from deposition of fibrous tissue, following persistent INFLAMMATION.

sclerosis

  1. (in animals) a hardening of tissue due to excess growth of fibrous tissue (scarring) or deposition of fatty plaques. A range of conditions can result, among them ARTERIOSCLEROSIS and multiple sclerosis, which is due to the degeneration of the myelin sheath of nerve fibres.
  2. (in plants), a hardening of the cell wall or tissue, often due to the deposition of LIGNIN.

Sclerosis

The process by which an irritating material is placed in the pleural space in order to inflame the pleural membranes and cause them to stick together, eliminating the pleural space and recurrent effusions.

sclerosis

tissue induration and fibrosis; associated with long-term chronic inflammation

scle·ro·sis

, pl. scleroses (skler-ōsis, -sēz)
1. Synonym(s): induration (2) .
2. In neuropathy, induration of nervous and other structures by a hyperplasia of the interstitial connective tissue.
[G. sklērōsis, hardness]

sclerosis (sklerō´sis),

n 1. a hardening of a tissue.
2. as applied to the jaws, sclerosis usually indicates an increased calcification centrally, with radiopacity.
3. as applied to dentin, the tracts of increased density in the dentin are referred to as areas of
dentinal sclerosis. It occurs beneath caries and with abfraction, abrasion, attrition, and erosion.
sclerosis, dentinal
n an occlusion of the dentinal tubules that inhibits outward fluid flow. It can occur naturally as root dentin ages but can also be caused by trauma, abrasion, or bacterial invasion. The sclerosing of the tubules produces translucent areas in the dentin.
sclerosis, multiple (MS),
n a remitting and relapsing disease of the central nervous system affecting principally the white matter. Manifestations include sensory and motor incoordination and paresthesias; often dementia, blindness, paraplegia, and death result.

sclerosis

an induration or hardening, especially hardening of a part from inflammation and in disease of the interstitial substance. The term is used chiefly for such a hardening of the intestine in the dog, hardening of the nervous system due to hyperplasia of the connective tissue or for hardening of the blood vessels.

arteriolar sclerosis
arteriolosclerosis.
nuclear sclerosis
increased density of the lens causing a gray-blue haze; seen as a normal feature of aging in dogs. This is often mistaken as cataract formation, but seldom is a cause of blindness.

Patient discussion about sclerosis

Q. does multiple sclerosis cause mood swings seem like i have changed. I 've become very irritable towards my family. Seems like I've become a mean person, and that has not my charactor.

A. MS can indeed cause depression or other mood changes such as euphoria, so it may be part of the disease. In addition, some treatments may also cause mood changes. If it bothers you, than consulting your doctor may be wise.

Take care…

Q. What is MS? I am 14 years old and my best friend has been diagnosed with MS. What is it? What causes it? Can I catch it?

A. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks the central nervous system (CNS), causing demyelination (loss of myelin). The myelin sheath helps the neurons (nerves) carry electrical signals. When having MS there is a thinning or complete loss of myelin and, sometimes, the cutting of the neuron's extensions or axons. When the myelin is lost, the neurons can no longer effectively conduct their electrical signals. It may cause numerous physical and mental symptoms. MS is not contagious and does not shorten the life expectancy of those who are diagnosed with the disease. Although the disease may not be cured or prevented at this time, treatments are available to reduce severity and delay progression.

More discussions about sclerosis
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