diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.