diffraction

(redirected from diffract)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to diffract: diffraction grating, refract

diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.
References in periodicals archive ?
They derive from interference patterns created when light diffracts as it passes through a two-dimensional grid.
The discovery in 1912 that crystals could diffract x-rays discretely implied either their periodicity or quasiperiodicity.
It is a quirk of nature that the way light diffracts through a grating means that there is an increase in dispersion with increasing order.
A grating is inscribed into the waveguide, which diffracts the light into wavelength-specific angles: different wavelengths are diffracted to a different extent, so they end up spatially separated.
A diffraction grating (DG) is a passive optical component that diffracts polychromatic light into its component wavelengths or monochromatic light into surfaces of constant phase, Fig.
A low-energy x-ray beam diffracts off of the sample.
In Parsifal, Graham diffracts an interlude composed by Wagner's assistant, Engelbert Humperdinck, into an array of musical epicycles for each of the fourteen orchestral parts, the combinations of which would take more than thirty-nine billion years to play out.
The beamline for the UCN station begins with the double-crystal monochromator that diffracts a monochromatic neutron beam centered at 0.
Our sensor diffracts light in a narrow wavelength band (color) in the visible spectrum; the diffracted band shifts as the glucose concentration changes.
His lab has developed a chip device that diffracts light in the presence of certain antibodies.
The microstructure of the insect's wings not only shuns water but also scatters and diffracts light to create an iridescent color.
Because light bends, or diffracts, around the edges of objects, ordinary optical microscopes can discern features no closer than a half-wavelength apart, a distance of 200 nanometers (nm) or so.