difficult airway


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A clinical situation in which a conventionally trained anesthesiologist experiences difficulty with face mask ventilation of the upper airway, difficulty with tracheal intubation, or both. The difficult airway represents a complex interaction between patient factors, the clinical setting, and the skills of the practitioner

difficult airway

An airway that is challenging or impossible to intubate. Intubation is increasingly difficult in: older patients, patients with head or neck trauma, obese patients, and patients with craniofacial abnormalities.
See also: airway
References in periodicals archive ?
In this multicenter randomized trial, we compared our novel approach with the traditional approach of tracheal intubation in patients with the suspected difficult airway.
Laryngeal tube suction II for difficult airway management in neonates and small infants.
Management of the potential difficult airway remains a major clinical challenge.
This feature makes sugammadex preferable for the management of difficult airways as it rapidly eliminates neuromuscular blockades (8).
However, as opposed to our study, previous larger trials(4-8) showed better glottic view in patients with normal and difficult airway when using videolaryngoscopy as compared to directoscopy.
Several studies have reported improved laryngoscopic views and greater intubation success rates in patients with predicted and known difficult airways using the McGrath video laryngoscope.
Awake fiberoptic intubation using an optical stylet in an anticipated difficult airway.
The same obesity causing this abundant adipose pannus may be implicated in the anatomy of the difficult airway.
Difficult airway management is a basic educational field in emergency medicine residency training, and alternative airway device courses are offered in many training sessions and meetings.
The upper lip bite test (ULBT) was developed by Khan et al7 in an effort to produce a simple single test that could be used preoperatively to evaluate for a difficult airway.
Anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, surgeons, and other contributors based in North America and Australia cover head and neck anatomy, instruments, preoperative evaluation, the difficult airway, endoscopic airway examination, awake intubation, anesthesia for trauma and emergencies, airway pathology and anesthetic implications, the use of Heliox in managing stridor, and the prevention and management of airway fires, then anesthesia for nasal, sinus, pituitary, head and neck, laryngotracheal, bronchoscopic, and pediatric surgery, including laryngoplasty, facial transplantation, and jaw and face reconstruction.