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diet

 [di´et]
1. the customary amount and kind of food and drink taken by a person from day to day.
2. more narrowly, a regimen of food intake planned to meet specific requirements of the individual, including or excluding certain foods. See also nutrition.
acid-ash diet a special diet prescribed to increase the acidity of the urine so that alkaline salts will remain in solution. The diet may be given to aid in the elimination of fluid in certain kinds of edema, in the treatment of some types of urinary tract infection, and to inhibit the formation of alkaline urinary calculi. Meat, fish, eggs, and cereals are emphasized, with little fruit and vegetables and no milk or cheese.
alkali-ash diet a therapeutic diet prescribed to increase the alkalinity of the urine and dissolve uric acid and cystine urinary calculi. This type of diet changes the urinary pH so that certain salts are kept in solution and excreted in the urine. Emphasis is placed on fruits, vegetables, and milk. Meat, eggs, bread, and cereals are restricted.
bland diet one that is free from any irritating or stimulating foods.
DASH diet (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products; low in saturated and total fats; low in cholesterol; and high in fiber. Research studies support the hypothesis that this diet reduces blood pressure and may play a role in prevention of high blood pressure.
elemental diet one consisting of a well-balanced, residue-free mixture of all essential and nonessential amino acids combined with simple sugars, electrolytes, trace elements, and vitamins.
elimination diet one for diagnosis of food allergy, based on omission of foods that might cause symptoms in the patient.
Feingold diet a controversial diet for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, which excludes artificial colorings and flavorings, preservatives, and salicylates. The national institutes of health consensus statement, Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, notes that exclusion diets like this are an area warranting additional research.
gluten-free diet see gluten-free diet.
high calorie diet one that furnishes more calories than needed to maintain weight, often more than 3500–4000 calories per day.
high fat diet one that furnishes more than 35 per cent of its total calories from fats; see also ketogenic diet.
high fiber diet one high in dietary fiber (typically more than 24 g daily), which decreases bowel transit time and relieves constipation.
high protein diet one containing large amounts of protein, consisting largely of meats, fish, milk, legumes, and nuts.
ketogenic diet one that produces ketones or acetones, or mild acidosis, such as one that is low in calories with insufficient carbohydrate and protein; it is occasionally used in the treatment of epilepsy. See also low fat diet.
liquid diet see liquid diet.
low calorie diet one containing fewer calories than needed to maintain weight, e.g., less than 1200 calories per day for an adult.
low fat diet one containing limited amounts of fat.
low fiber diet low residue diet.
low purine diet one for mitigation of gout, omitting meat, fowl, and fish and substituting milk, eggs, cheese, and vegetable protein.
low residue diet one with a minimum of cellulose and fiber and restriction of connective tissue found in certain cuts of meat. It is prescribed for irritations of the intestinal tract, after surgery of the large intestine, in partial intestinal obstruction, or when limited bowel movements are desirable, as in colostomy patients. Called also low fiber diet and minimal residue diet.
low tyramine diet a special diet required by patients receiving MAO inhibitors. Foods containing tyramine include aged cheeses, red wine, beer, cream, chocolate, and yeast.
minimal residue diet low residue diet.
protein-sparing diet one consisting only of liquid protein or liquid mixtures of proteins, vitamins, and minerals, containing no more than 600 calories; it is designed to maintain a favorable nitrogen balance. Such diets have been used in weight loss programs, but are used only rarely now, usually only in inpatient settings.
purine-free diet low purine diet.
vegan diet the diet of a vegan; see also veganism.
vegetarian diet see vegetarian diet.

di·et

(dī'et),
1. Food and drink in general.
2. A prescribed course of eating and drinking in which the amount and kind of food, as well as the times at which it is to be taken, are regulated for therapeutic purposes.
3. Reduction of caloric intake so as to lose weight.
4. To follow any prescribed or specific diet.
[G. diaita, a way of life; a diet]

diet

/di·et/ (di´it) the customary amount and kind of food and drink taken by a person from day to day; more narrowly, a diet planned to meet specific requirements of the individual, including or excluding certain foods.di´etary
acid-ash diet  one of meat, fish, eggs, and cereals with little fruit or vegetables and no cheese or milk.
alkali-ash diet  one of fruit, vegetables, and milk with as little as possible of meat, fish, eggs, and cereals.
balanced diet  one containing foods which furnish all the nutritive factors in proper proportion for adequate nutrition.
bland diet  one that is free of irritating or stimulating foods.
diabetic diet  one prescribed in diabetes mellitus, usually limited in the amount of sugar or readily available carbohydrate.
elimination diet  one for diagnosis of food allergy, based on sequential omission of foods that might cause the symptoms.
Feingold diet  a controversial diet for hyperactive children which excludes artificial colors, artificial flavors, preservatives, and salicylates.
gouty diet  one for mitigation of gout, restricting nitrogenous, especially high-purine foods, and substituting dairy products, with prohibition of wines and liquors.
high calorie diet  one furnishing more calories than needed to maintain weight, often more than 3500–4000 calories per day.
high fat diet  ketogenic d.
high fiber diet  one relatively high in dietary fibers, which decreases bowel transit time and relieves constipation.
high protein diet  one containing large amounts of protein, consisting largely of meat, fish, milk, legumes, and nuts.
ketogenic diet  one containing large amounts of fat, with minimal amounts of protein and carbohydrate.
low calorie diet  one containing fewer calories than needed to maintain weight, e.g., less than 1200 calories per day for an adult.
low fat diet  one containing limited amounts of fat.
low purine diet  one for mitigation of gout, omitting meat, fowl, and fish and substituting milk, eggs, cheese, and vegetable protein.
low residue diet  one giving the least possible fecal residue.
low salt diet , low sodium diet one containing very little sodium chloride; often prescribed for hypertension and edematous states.
protein-sparing diet  one consisting only of liquid proteins or liquid mixtures of proteins, vitamins, and minerals, and containing no more than 600 calories; designed to maintain a favorable nitrogen balance.
purine-free diet  see low purine d.
salt-free diet  low salt d.

diet

(dī′ĭt)
n.
1. The usual food and drink of a person or animal.
2. A regulated selection of foods, as for medical reasons or cosmetic weight loss.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a food regimen designed to promote weight loss in a person or an animal: the diet industry.
2.
a. Having fewer calories.
b. Sweetened with a noncaloric sugar substitute.
3. Designed to reduce or suppress the appetite: diet pills; diet drugs.
v. di·eted, di·eting, di·ets
v.intr.
To eat and drink according to a regulated system, especially so as to lose weight or control a medical condition.
v.tr.
To regulate or prescribe food and drink for.

di′et·er n.

diet

[dī′it]
Etymology: Gk, diaita, way of living
1 food and drink considered with regard to their nutritional qualities, composition, and effects on health.
2 nutrients prescribed, regulated, or restricted as to kind and amount for therapeutic or other purposes.
3 the customary allowance of food and drink regularly provided or consumed. Compare nutrition. See also specific diets. dietetic, adj.
To eat and drink according to a prescribed regimen

diet

Nutrition Eating and drinking either sparingly or according to a prescribed regimen; diets are either for supplementation–ie weight gain or restriction–ie weight loss; in restrictive diets, the intent is to limit one or more dietary components–eg, gluten or oxalate, or to globally ↓ caloric intake

di·et

(dī'ĕt)
1. Food and drink in general.
2. A prescribed course of eating and drinking in which the amount and kind of food, as well as the times at which it is to be taken, are regulated for therapeutic purposes.
3. Reduction of caloric intake so as to lose weight.
4. To follow any prescribed or specific diet.
[G. diaita, a way of life; a diet]

di·et

(dī'ĕt)
1. Food and drink in general.
2. Prescribed course of eating and drinking in which amount and kind of food, as well as times consumed, are regulated for therapeutic purposes.
3. Reduction of intake to lose weight.
4. To carry out any prescribed or specific diet.
[G. diaita, a way of life; a diet]

diet,

n 1. the food and drink consumed by a given person from day to day. Not all the diet is necessarily used by the body. For this reason, diet and nutrition must be differentiated.
v 2. to eat according to a plan.
diet, alkaline,
n a diet that is basic in reaction; produced by the addition of alkaline salts, including sodium bicarbonate.
diet, cariogenic,
n the intake of food that is heavy in refined carbohydrates and other food stuffs that support the growth of caries-producing bacteria.
diet, lysine-poor,
n a diet deficient in lysine, an essential amino acid. All the essential amino acids must be present in the diet; should one or more be absent, proper use of the others cannot occur. Periodontal changes described in experimental animals with lysine deficiency include osteoporosis of supporting bone and disintegration and failure of replacement of periodontal fibers.

diet

the customary amount and kind of food and drink taken by an animal from day to day; more narrowly, a diet planned to meet specific requirements of the animal, including or excluding certain foods. See also winter diet.

acid diet
diets of low alkalinity which are fed to cows to prevent milk fever. The diet in the 4 weeks preceding parturition, which is ordinarily highly alkaline, is supplemented with calcium chloride, and aluminum and magnesium sulfates, to reduce this alkalinity.
bland diet
one that is free from any irritating or stimulating foods.
calcium homeostatic diet
a diet aimed at maintaining normal blood levels of calcium in recently calved cows.
calculolytic diet
formulated to aid in the dissolution of struvite uroliths. Usually provides a low intake of protein, restricts phosphorus and magnesium, and acidifies the urine. Additional salt may also be included. These have been used successfully in dogs and cats.
deficient diet
see nutritional deficiency disease.
drought feeding diet
elemental diet
contains nutrients as small molecular weight compounds, i.e. proteins as amino acids or peptides, carbohydrates as oligosaccharides or monosaccharides, and fats as medium-chain triglycerides. Used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Called also monomeric diet.
elimination diet
one for diagnosing food allergy, based on the sequential omission of foods which might cause the clinical signs in the patient.
geriatric diet
may vary in composition; generally, they are formulated to provide lower energy intake and increased digestibility.
gluten-free diet
one without wheat, rye, barley, buckwheat, or oats or related products.
high-calorie diet, high-energy diet
one that furnishes more calories than needed for maintenance; used to increase body condition, in recovery from illness and for maintenance under stressful conditions.
high-fiber diet
one relatively high in dietary fiber; in dogs and cats, used in the management of large and small bowel diarrhea, diabetes mellitus, constipation and obesity.
high-protein diet
one containing large amounts of protein; used in the management of dogs and cats recovering from illness.
home-prepared diet
one prepared in the home kitchen, in contrast with commercially prepared pet foods.
hypoallergenic diet
one formulated to avoid suspected allergens; usually used in the management of allergic skin or bowel disease.
liquid diet
a diet limited to liquids or to foods that can be changed to a liquid state.
low-calorie diet
one containing fewer calories than needed to maintain weight; normally used in management of obesity in dogs and cats.
low-fat diet
one containing limited amounts of fat; used in the management of pancreatic disease, bowel disease, and obesity in dogs and cats.
low-fiber diet
see low-residue diet (below).
low purine diet
in dogs and cats, generally a low-meat diet.
low-residue diet
one with a minimum of cellulose and fiber and restriction of connective tissue found in certain cuts of meat. It is prescribed for irritations of the intestinal tract, after surgery of the large intestine, in partial intestinal obstruction, or when limited bowel movements are desirable. Called also low-fiber diet.
low vitamin A diet
one containing low levels of vitamin A; in dog and cat diets, this would mean little or no organ meats. The only probable indication for such a diet is in the treatment of hypervitaminosis A.
lower urinary tract disease diet
one that promotes acidification of the urine and containing restricted magnesium and phosphorus, and sometimes increased salt.
monomeric diet
see elemental diet (above).
phosphate-restricted diet
one containing restricted amounts of phosphorus; used in the management of chronic renal disease.
polymeric diet
meal replacement diets; fed to animals with almost normal gastrointestinal function. Proteins, fats and carbohydrates are present in high molecular weight forms.
sodium-restricted diet
used in management of congestive heart failure and systemic hypertension in dogs and cats.

Patient discussion about diet

Q. What are the most common diets? when does a diet become dangerous to one's health?

A. any diet that was not approved by a nutritionist is dangerous. there a great amount of diets out there (believe me i tried most of the:) )and not all of them are healthy.
there is great importance for eating a stable amount of calories that won't be less or more then what you need. depends on things like how much physical activity you are doing and such.
another thing to notice- your body needs protein, carbon, vitamins and such- try not to pass them.

Q. where would i find information about diet and nutriton?

A. So you see that all my questions turn around you - you Jay. Because you are unique in this universe. You have your habit, hobbies and your preferences to live. A diet should be something that you can live easy going with. Else it is a torture. How many medication did you take in the past? Do you eat microwave-oven-food? Do you have such a device at home? Do you eat Tofu? Do you eat genetic-modified food? Do you eat the vegetables of your garden? Where would you buy your food for a healthy nutrition? In the supermarket, directly from a bio-farmer, or do you go every day three times a day in the restaurant "By Fernando" - the Italian, because of his fine pizzas and fantastic espresso? Start to write down what you like, what you don't like and where you buy the different things. Then visit a dietetist. Look to be guided. With the muscle-test you could find out which kind of food is good for you and which not. Here you find something about sugar:
http://www.pulsarsystems.ch/Diab

Q. Diet and Exercise Really Work? The greatest wealth is health. So Does Diet and Exercise Really Work?

A. Yes, IT IS!
If you choose only to limit your diet, you will have some benefits for your health.
If you choose only to do regular workout, you will also have some healthy benefits for that.

If you combine those two, you will surely double up the benefits for your health, hehehe..
Good Luck!

More discussions about diet
References in periodicals archive ?
As Gerhard Weber kom Dieter Ondracek op bladsy 364 tot die gevolgtrekking: "Sabine het hom gemaak en vernietig, haar verraad soveel dieper as wat hy ooit kon raai.
After the end of the war, Dieter and his mother, Erna, and brother Hans, stayed in what was left of Hamburg, befriending French prisoners of war and attempting to break into the unknown - the British occupied barracks.
Dieter, who signed an 18-month contract with Kilmarnock in January, scored the final winner on his birthday.
But Dieter was universally respected as a leader in the field.
Dieters who "break" their diets occasionally by eating high-calorie meals are more likely to be unhappy about their body image.
Refusing to denounce America, Dieter is sent to a remote jungle prison which already houses five inmates - helicopter pilot Lieutenant Duane Martin (Steve Zahn), Air America worker Eugene DeBruin (Jeremy Davies), and three Thai captives.
As months become years, the six men bond and Dieter gradually persuades them to fight for their lives.
VERDICT: Zahn injects black humour as the sidekick who sticks by Dieter every agonising step of the way, including a nerve-racking escape bid on a makeshift raft.
But the diet scheme relies too heavily on multiple complex charts and calculations of an individual's dietary needs, and could potentially confuse even the most dedicated dieters.
Texas is finding itself standing alone in its increasing application of the death penalty,' Dieter said.
Edited by Dieter Dowe, Heinz-Gerhard Haupt, Dieter Langewiesche, and Jonathan Sperber (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2001.
Losing weight can mean more for a dieter than shedding pounds.