diet quality index

diet quality index

a measure of the quality of the diet using a composite of eight recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and nutrients from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Meeting the standard is assigned a value of 0, within 30% of goal a value of 1, and differing by more than 30% a value of 2. The resulting index can be a figure of between 0-16, the lower the better. The NAS recommendations include: reducing total fat intake to 30% or less of total energy; reducing saturated fatty-acid intake to less than 10% of energy; reducing cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg daily; eating five or more servings daily of vegetables and fruits; increasing intake of starches and other complex carbohydrates by eating six or more servings daily of bread, cereal, and legumes; maintaining protein intake at moderate levels (levels lower than twice the RDA); limiting total daily intake of sodium to 2400 mg or less; and maintaining adequate calcium intake (approximately the RDA).

di·et qual·i·ty in·dex

(dī'ĕt kwahl'i-tē in'deks)
A measure of the value of a dietary regimen using a composite of eight recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and nutrients from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Meeting the standard is assigned a value of 0, within 30% of goal a value of 1, differing by more than 30% a 2. The resulting index can be a figure between 0-16, the lower the better. The NAS recommendations include reducing total fat intake to 30% or less of total energy; reducing saturated fatty acid intake to less than 10% of energy; reducing cholesterol intake to less than 300 mg daily; eating five or more servings daily of vegetables and fruits; increasing intake of starches and other complex carbohydrates by eating six or more servings daily of bread, cereal, and legumes; maintaining protein intake at moderate levels (i.e., levels lower than twice the RDA); limiting total daily intake of sodium to 2400 mg or less; and maintaining adequate calcium intake (approximately the RDA).

di·et qual·i·ty in·dex

(dī'ĕt kwahl'i-tē in'deks)
Measure of quality of diet using a composite of eight recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and nutrients from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS).
References in periodicals archive ?
The study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, found that those who improved their diet quality index scores by 10 percent over four years-by eating more whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and less sweetened beverages and saturated fats, for example - reduced their risk for
The study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, found that those who improved their diet quality index scores by 10 percent over four years - by eating more whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and less sweetened beverages and saturated fats, for example - reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by about 20 percent, compared to those who made no changes to their diets.
Carmichael and her colleagues developed two indexes of dietary quality, one modeled after the Mediterranean Diet Score and the second after the Diet Quality Index for Pregnancy.
An alternative index is the Diet Quality Index (DQI) (see Haines, Siega-Riz, and Popkin 1999 for details).
Based on student responses to the FFQ and Canadian food table, we estimated 1) number of daily servings of vegetables and fruits; 2) percentage of energy from dietary fat intake; 3) diet quality index (DQI), which is a composite index that encompasses diet variety, adequacy, moderation and balance.