diencephalon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

diencephalon

 [di″en-sef´ah-lon]
1. the posterior part of the prosencephalon, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often considered to be a distinct division. See also brainstem.
2. the posterior of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization of the prosencephalon in the developing embryo. See illustration.
Diencephalon. Posterior (dorsal) A and anterior (inferior) B views of the base of the brain, showing the diencephalon in relation to the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain). From Dorland's, 2000.

di·en·ceph·a·lon

, pl.

di·en·ceph·a·la

(dī'en-sef'ă-lon, -sef'ă-lă), [TA]
The caudal part of the prosencephalon composed of the dorsal thalamus (or thalamus) epithalamus, subthalamus, and hypothalamus. the geniculate bodies, sometimes referred to as the metathalamus, are actualy part of the thalamus.
[G. dia, through, + enkephalos, brain]

diencephalon

/di·en·ceph·a·lon/ (di″en-sef´ah-lon)
1. the posterior part of the forebrain, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often recognized as a distinct division.
Enlarge picture
Diencephalon. Posterior (dorsal) (A) and anterior (inferior) (B) views of the base of the brain, showing the diencephalon in relation to the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain).
2. the posterior of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization in embryonic development. See also brain stem. diencephal´ic

diencephalon

(dī′ĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏn′, -lən)
n.
The posterior part of the forebrain that connects the midbrain with the cerebral hemispheres, encloses the third ventricle, and contains the thalamus and hypothalamus. Also called betweenbrain, interbrain.

di·en·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

diencephalon

[dī′ənsef′əlon]
Etymology: Gk, di + enkephalon, brain
the portion of the brain between the cerebrum and the mesencephalon. It consists of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus, and the epithalamus and includes most of the third ventricle.
enlarge picture
Diencephalon

di·en·ceph·a·lon

, pl. diencephala (dī'en-sef'ă-lon, -lă) [TA]
That part of the prosencephalon composed of the epithalamus, dorsal thalamus, subthalamus, and hypothalamus.
[G. dia, through, + enkephalos, brain]

diencephalon

The central, lower part of the brain that contains the BASAL GANGLIA, THE THALAMUS, the HYPOTHALAMUS, the PITUITARY gland.

diencephalon

the part of the forebrain that contains the thalamus and hypothalamus and lies beneath the cerebral hemispheres.

Diencephalon

A part of the brain that binds the mesencephalon to the cerebral hemispheres. Considered by some as part of the brain stem.
Mentioned in: Korsakoff's Syndrome

diencephalon

collective term denoting thalamus, subthalamus and hypothalamus

diencephalon

1. the caudal part of the forebrain, consisting of the hypothalamus, thalamus, metathalamus and epithalamus; the subthalamus is often considered to be a distinct division.
2. the more caudal of the two brain vesicles formed by specialization of the prosencephalon in the developing embryo. See also brainstem.
References in periodicals archive ?
one of those structures, the diencephalon , located right above the brain stem (Duvernoy & Bourgouin, 1999), includes the thalamus, hypothalamus, and the pineal gland.
Importantly, elaborate momentary confabulations often involve damage to ventromedial prefrontal lobes and the diencephalon, while the behaviorally spontaneous confabulations involve damage to the posterior orbitofrontal cortex or related anterior limbic structures.
By around 12 weeks of development the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, mesencephalon, cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata and spinal cord have formed (Martini 2004).
The secondary vesicles arise from the primary vesicles: the prosencephalon divides into the telencephalon anteriorly and the diencephalon posteriorly; the rhombencephalon divides into the anterior metencephalon and the posterior myelencephalon.
Designed as a study guide for the USMLE but also useful as a refresher and course supplement, this compact treatment covers a range of topics, including development, gross anatomy, blood supply, cytology, the spinal cord, the brain stem, the cerebellum, basal ganglia, diencephalon and limbic systems, visual system, papillary reflexes, the cerebral cortex and higher functions.
Intraventricular administration of Al-maltolate to rabbits developed widespread neurofibrillary degeneration involving pyramidal neurons of the isocortex and allocortex, projection neurons of the diencephalon, and nerve cells of the brain stem and spinal cord (37).
Using [123I]beta-CIT tropane-2beta-corboxylate, Kugaya and colleagues (2004) were able to correlate serotonin transporter availability in the diencephalon to positive SSRI response in depressed patients.
5 days (17x) Brightfield, Darkfield, Fluorescence (GFP, RFP) 2nd Place Michael Hendricks Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory National University of Singapore Kent Ridge, Singapore Zebrafish embryo midbrain and diencephalon (20x) Confocal 3rd Place Wim van Egmond Micropolitan Museum Rotterdam, The Netherlands Testudinella patina (a rotifer) (400x) Differential Interference Contrast 4th Place Charles Krebs Charles Krebs Photography Issaquah, Washington, USA Marine diatoms attached to Polysiphonia (red algae) (100x) Differential Interference Contrast 5th Place Peter Parks Imagequestmarine.
11) Symmetric, low-density abnormalities in the diencephalon, midbrain, and periventricular regions that enhance following contrast injection may be seen on CT scan.
Wire in the monkey's diencephalon prints out a wave most beautiful.
These EEG responsive disorders appear to have a common characteristic in that they seem mediated through the physical structures in the diencephalon within which the limbic system functions.
The common insult in all cases of BIND results from a total serum bilirubin (TSB) concentration that exceeds the infant's neuroprotective defenses and leads to neuronal injury, primarily in the basal ganglia, central and peripheral auditory pathways, hippocampus, diencephalon, subthalamic nuclei, midbrain, cerebellum and pontine and brain-stem nuclei for oculomotor function and for respiratory, neurohumoral, and electrolyte control.