dichromatism


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dichromatism

 [di-kro´mah-tizm]
1. the quality of existing in or exhibiting two different colors.

di·chro·ma·tism

(dī-krō'mă-tizm),
1. The state of being dichromatic (1).
2. The abnormality of color vision in which only two of the three retinal cone pigments are present, as in protanopia, deuteranopia, and tritanopia. Synonym(s): dichromatopsia
[G. di-, two, + chrōma, color]

dichromatism

/di·chro·ma·tism/ (di-kro´mah-tizm)
1. the quality of existing in or exhibiting two different colors.

dichromatism

(dī-krō′mə-tĭz′əm) also

dichromism

(-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality or condition of having or exhibiting two colors.
2. A form of colorblindness in which only two of the three fundamental colors can be distinguished due to a lack of one of the cone pigments.

di′cro·mat′ic (-măt′ĭk) adj.

di·chro·ma·tism

(dī-krō'mă-tizm)
1. The state of being dichromatic (1).
2. The abnormality of color vision in which only two of the three retinal cone pigments are present, as in protanopia, deuteranopia, and tritanopia.
Synonym(s): dichromatopsia.
[G. di-, two, + chrōma, color]

dichromatism

Partial color blindness in which only two of the primary colours can be perceived.

dichromatism

A form of colour vision deficiency in which all colours can be matched by a mixture of only two primary colours. The spectrum appears as consisting of two colours separated by an achromatic area (the neutral point). There are several types of dichromatism: deuteranopia, protanopia and tritanopia. Syn. daltonism; dichromatopsia; dichromatic vision. See defective colour vision; visual pigment.

dichromatism

1. the quality of existing in or exhibiting two different colors.
2. dichromatopsia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sexual dichromatism in the yellow-breasted chat lcteria virens: spectrophotometric analysis and biochemical basis.
Although monogamous birds can exhibit dichromatism as a result of sexual selection, they are not expected to have the degree of exaggeration of traits seen in many polygynous species (Kirkpatrick et al.
In labroids, Robertson & Hoffman (1977) suggested that epigamic selection plays a much more important role than intra-sexual selection in the development of sexual dichromatism (though not for species possessing strictly haremic mating systems), and reasoned that despite being more costly to maintain than permanent dichromatism, natural selection would favor the development of ephemeral dichromatism in environments where continuous display of conspicuous signals would increase the risk of predation.
ceres, crests), colors of soft parts, sexual dichromatism, flight abilities, flight displays and elaborate vocalizations in columbiform species that parallel analogous traits in the original Darwin's pigeons and other domestic breeds of the Rock Rove (Table 1).
Permanent dichromatism has not been described in the Epinephelinae but is common in the Anthiinae in association with sex change and sexual dimorphism (Shapiro 1981).
Similar differences in species richness have previously been associated with sexual dichromatism (Barraclough et al.
The pronounced differences in color of the anal fin in this species (see above) indicate the possibility of sexual dichromatism but determining the sex of large Caranx is best done with freshly caught specimens.
4:20 SEXUAL DICHROMATISM AND SPAWNING BEHAVIOR OF THE KELP BASS, PARALABRAX CLATHRATUS, FROM SANTA CATALINA ISLAND, CALIFORNIA.
This geographic pattern of monochromatism and dichromatism occurs repeatedly in each of the six major clades within the dabbling ducks (Anas): wigeons, mallards, blue-wings, austral teal, pintails, and the green wing clade (see [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1A OMITTED] below) (Livezey 1991).
A number of apogonids display temporary dichromatism during courtship, others do not.
Visual fish transects performed at two sites were used to assess the seasonal frequency of sexual dichromatism in adults.