dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane


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di·chlor·o·di·phen·yl·tri·chlo·ro·eth·ane (DDT),

(dī-klōr'ō-di-fen'il-trī'klōr-ō-eth'ān),
An insecticide that came into prominence during and after World War II. For a time it proved effective, but insect populations rapidly developed tolerance for it, hence much of its original effectiveness has been lost; general usage is now widely discouraged because of the toxicity that results from the environmental persistence of this agent.
Synonym(s): dicophane

dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane

See DDT.
References in periodicals archive ?
12] This led directly to the strategy of indoor house spraying used globally when residual insecticides such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) became available after World War II.
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a well-known organochlorine pesticide.
DDT: Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has had a long history of saving human lives, particularly through its effectiveness against mosquitoes carrying malaria and yellow fever.
The villain was identified and conquered: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, DDT.
Continuous exposure to commonly used insecticide, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, or DDT, may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, latest research shows.
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ERa in mouse livers.
Pacific sanddab inhabits polluted waters off the coast of southern California where it associates with bottom sediments that contain a variety of contaminants like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), polychiorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as heavy metals (Eganhouse and Venkatesan 1993).
The modern era of synthetically produced pesticides began in the 1930s, most notably with the development of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT).
The reintroduction of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in 2000 resulted in this vector once again being eliminated from SA.
She thinks the toxic substances found in Euzal's body, such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), which is commonly used as an insecticide and was banned in Turkey in 1980, might have entered the former president's body via the food he ate.