murmur

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Related to diastolic murmurs: presystolic murmur

murmur

 [mer´mer]
an auscultatory sound, benign or pathologic, loud or soft, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.
aortic murmur a sound indicative of disease of the aortic valve.
apex murmur (apical murmur) a heart murmur heard over the apex of the heart.
arterial murmur one in an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
Austin Flint murmur a loud presystolic murmur at the apex heard when aortic regurgitation is preventing the mitral valve from closing; called also Flint's murmur.
blood murmur one due to an abnormal, commonly anemic, condition of the blood. Called also hemic murmur.
cardiac murmur heart murmur.
cardiopulmonary murmur one produced by the impact of the heart against the lung.
continuous murmur a humming heart murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
crescendo murmur one marked by progressively increasing loudness that suddenly ceases.
Cruveilhier-Baumgarten murmur one heard at the abdominal wall over veins connecting the portal and caval systems.
diastolic murmur a heart murmur heard at diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonic regurgitation with forward flow across the atrioventricular valve; it has a rumbling quality.
Duroziez's murmur a double murmur during systole and diastole, palpated over the femoral or another large peripheral artery; due to aortic insufficiency.
ejection murmur a systolic murmur heard predominantly in midsystole, when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are at their maximum; it is produced by ejection of blood into the pulmonary artery and aorta.
Flint's murmur Austin Flint murmur.
friction murmur friction rub.
functional murmur a heart murmur occurring in the absence of structural changes in the heart, usually due to high cardiac output states. Called also innocent murmur and physiologic murmur.
Gibson murmur a long rumbling sound occupying most of systole and diastole, usually localized in the second left interspace near the sternum, and usually indicative of patent ductus arteriosus. Called also machinery murmur.
Graham Steell murmur a high-pitched diastolic murmur due to pulmonic regurgitation in patients with pulmonary hypertension and mitral stenosis.
heart murmur see heart murmur.
hemic murmur blood murmur.
innocent murmur functional murmur.
machinery murmur Gibson murmur.
mitral murmur a heart murmur due to disease of the mitral valve; it can be either obstructive or regurgitant.
musical murmur one that has a periodic harmonic pattern; it may be either a heart murmur or a vascular murmur.
organic murmur one due to a lesion in the organ or organ system being examined, e.g., in the heart, in a blood vessel, or in lung tissue.
pansystolic murmur a regurgitant murmur heard throughout systole, due to blood flow between two chambers normally of very different pressures in systole; the most common causes are mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, and ventricular septal defects.
physiologic murmur functional murmur.
prediastolic murmur one occurring just before and with diastole, due to aortic regurgitation or pulmonic regurgitation.
presystolic murmur one shortly before the onset of ventricular ejection, usually associated with a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonic murmur one due to disease of the pulmonary valve or artery.
regurgitant murmur a heart murmur due to a dilated valvular orifice with consequent valvular regurgitation.
seagull murmur a raucous murmur resembling the call of a seagull, frequently heard in aortic stenosis or mitral regurgitation.
Still's murmur a functional heart murmur of childhood, with a buzzing or vibratory tone heard in midsystole; it usually disappears by puberty.
systolic murmur a heart murmur heard at systole, usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
to-and-fro murmur a friction sound or murmur heard with both systole and diastole.
tricuspid murmur a heart murmur caused by disease of the tricuspid valve; it may be either obstructive or regurgitant.
vascular murmur one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur vesicular breath sounds.

mur·mur

(mer'mĕr), Avoid the misspelling murmer.
1. A soft sound, like that made by a somewhat forcible expiration with the mouth open, heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, or blood vessels. Synonym(s): susurrus
2. An other-than-soft sound, which may be loud, harsh, or frictional; organic cardiac murmurs may be soft or loud and harsh; pericardial murmurs usually are frictional and are more properly described as "rubs" rather than murmurs.
[L.]

murmur

/mur·mur/ (mur´mer) [L.] an auscultatory sound, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.
anemic murmur  a cardiac murmur heard in anemia.
aortic murmur  one generated by blood flowing through a diseased aorta or aortic valve.
arterial murmur  one over an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
Austin Flint murmur  a presystolic murmur heard at the apex in aortic regurgitation.
cardiac murmur  one of finite length generated by turbulence of blood flow through the heart.
Carey Coombs murmur  a rumbling mid-diastolic murmur occurring in the active phase of rheumatic fever.
continuous murmur  a humming cardiac murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
Cruveilhier-Baumgarten murmur  one heard at the abdominal wall over veins connecting the portal and caval systems.
diastolic murmurs  cardiac murmurs heard during diastole, usually due to semilunar valve regurgitation or to altered blood flow through atrioventricular valves.
Duroziez's murmur  a double murmur over the femoral or other large peripheral artery; due to aortic insufficiency.
ejection murmur  a type of systolic murmur usually heard in midsystole when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are maximal, such as in aortic or pulmonary stenosis.
extracardiac murmur  one heard over the heart but originating from another structure.
friction murmur  see rub.
functional murmur  a cardiac murmur generated in the absence of organic cardiac disease.
Gibson murmur  a long, rumbling cardiac murmur heard for most of systole and diastole, usually in the second left interspace near the sternum, indicative of patent ductus arteriosus.
Graham Steell's murmur  one due to pulmonary regurgitation in patients with pulmonary hypertension and mitral stenosis.
heart murmur  cardiac m.
innocent murmur  functional m.
machinery murmur  Gibson m.
musical murmur  a cardiac murmur having a periodic harmonic pattern.
organic murmur  one due to a lesion in an organ, e.g., the heart, a vessel, or a lung.
pansystolic murmur  a regurgitant murmur heard throughout systole.
pericardial murmur  see under rub.
prediastolic murmur  a cardiac murmur heard just before and with diastole; due to mitral obstruction, or to aortic or pulmonary regurgitation.
presystolic murmur  a cardiac murmur heard just before ventricular ejection, usually associated with atrial contraction and the acceleration of blood flow through a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonic murmur  one due to disease of the pulmonary valve or artery.
regurgitant murmur  one due to regurgitation of blood through an abnormal valvular orifice.
seagull murmur  a raucous murmur with musical qualities, such as that heard occasionally in aortic insufficiency.
Still's murmur  a low-frequency, vibratory or buzzing, functional cardiac murmur of childhood, heard in midsystole.
systolic murmurs  cardiac murmurs heard during systole; usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
to-and-fro murmur  a friction rub heard in both systole and diastole.
vascular murmur  one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur  vesicular breath sounds.

murmur

(mûr′mər)
n.
1. A low, indistinct, continuous sound: spoke in a murmur; the murmur of the waves.
2. An indistinct, whispered, or confidential complaint; a mutter.
3. Medicine An abnormal sound, usually emanating from the heart, that sometimes indicates a diseased condition.
v. mur·mured, mur·muring, mur·murs
v.intr.
1. To make a low, continuous, indistinct sound or succession of sounds.
2. To complain in low mumbling tones; grumble.
v.tr.
To say in a low indistinct voice; utter indistinctly: murmured his approval.

mur′mur·er n.
mur′mur·ing·ly adv.
mur′mur·ous adj.
mur′mur·ous·ly adv.

murmur

[mur′mər]
Etymology: L, a humming
a gentle blowing, fluttering, or humming sound, such as a heart murmur, susceptible to auscultation. Types of murmurs include systolic, diastolic, and continuous murmurs.
An auscultatory sound of cardiac or vascular origin, usually caused by an abnormal flow of blood in the heart due to structural defects of the valves or septum; murmurs may be benign or pathological

murmur

Heart murmur Cardiology An auscultatory sound of cardiac or vascular origin, usually caused by an abnormal flow of blood in the heart due to structural defects of the valves or septum; murmurs may be benign or pathological. See Austin Flint murmur, Cardiopulmonary murmur, Cooing murmur, Graham Steel murmur, Innocent murmur, Late systolic murmur, Machinery murmur, Middiastolic murmur, Millwheel murmur, Musical murmur, Pistol shot murmur, Regurgitant murmur, Roger's murmur.

mur·mur

(mŭr'mŭr)
An abnormal, usually periodic sound heard on auscultation of the heart or blood vessels.
[L.]

murmur

A purring or rumbling sound of variable pitch heard through a STETHOSCOPE especially over the heart or over a narrowed or compressed artery. Murmurs are caused by turbulence in blood flow and often imply disease such as heart valve narrowing or incompetence. See also HEART SOUNDS.

Murmur

An abnormal heart sound that can reflect a valve dysfunction.
Mentioned in: Aortic Valve Stenosis

heart murmur

a sound additional to the normal heart sounds, heard on auscultation of the heart. Many murmurs are of no significance (innocent, physiological murmurs), particularly in young children, or due to increased blood flow through the heart during exercise, or in pregnancy. pathological murmurs may be due to abnormalities in the heart's structure or turbulent flow through a heart valve abnormality (congenital or acquired: in adults most commonly following rheumatic fever). Symptoms may include breathlessness, palpitations, chest pain or fainting but many murmurs are asymptomatic and are identified, for example, during routine medical examination. All sports participants found to have a murmur should undergo full cardiovascular assessment, including echocardiography, to exclude any cause which might increase the risk of sudden death during exercise. Management is of the underlying cause and surgery may be indicated in certain conditions, especially for significantly narrowed heart valves. See also heart sounds, medical screening.

mur·mur

(mŭr'mŭr)
1. A soft sound, like that made by a somewhat forcible expiration with the mouth open, heard on auscultation of the heart, lungs, or blood vessels.
2. An other-than-soft sound, which may be loud, harsh, or frictional.
[L.]

murmur,

n a humming or blowing sound heard on auscultation.
murmur, aortic,
a murmur resulting from insufficiency of the aortic valve secondary to involvement by rheumatic fever or tertiary syphilis.
murmur, apical diastolic,
n a murmur heard over the apex of the heart and caused by mitral stenosis, relative mitral stenosis, or aortic insufficiency.
murmur, apical systolic,
n a murmur heard at the apex of the heart in systole and caused by mitral insufficiency, which may result from rheumatic heart disease, or by relative mitral insufficiency, which may result from congestive heart failure associated with arteriosclerosis or hypertension. It may also have a functional basis.
murmur, basal diastolic,
n a murmur heard over the base of the heart and caused by aortic insufficiency resulting from rheumatic heart disease or syphilis, relative aortic insufficiency associated with diastolic hypertension, or a patent ductus arteriosus.
murmur, basal systolic,
n a murmur heard over the base of the heart and caused by aortic stenosis resulting from rheumatic heart disease or by relative stenosis of the aortic valve resulting from aortic dilation secondary to arteriosclerosis or hypertension. It may also be functional or may result from congenital heart or vascular defects.
murmur, cardiac,
n (heart murmur), an abnormal sound heard in the region of the heart at any time during the heart's cycle. They may be named according to the area of generation (mitral, aortic, pulmonary, or tricuspid) and according to the period of the cycle (diastolic or systolic).
murmur, functional,
n (innocent murmur, inorganic murmur), a murmur resulting from the position of the body, severe anemia, or polycythemia. Not related to structural changes in the heart.
murmur, heart,
n See murmur, cardiac.
murmur, innocent,
n See murmur, functional.
murmur, inorganic,
n See murmur, functional.
murmur, mitral,
n a heart murmur produced by a defect in the mitral valve. It is the most common form of murmur in rheumatic heart disease.
murmur, organic,
n a murmur resulting from structural changes in the heart or in the great vessels of the heart.

murmur

an auscultatory sound, particularly a periodic sound of short duration of cardiac or vascular origin.

anemic murmur
see blood murmur (below).
aortic murmur
a sound indicative of disease of the aortic valve.
apex murmur
one heard over the apex of the heart.
arterial murmur
one in an artery, sometimes aneurysmal and sometimes constricted.
blood murmur
one due to an abnormal, commonly anemic, condition of the blood. Called also anemic murmur.
cardiac murmur
see heart murmur (below).
cardiopulmonary murmur
one produced by the impact of the heart against the lung.
continuous murmur
a humming murmur heard throughout systole and diastole.
crescendo murmur
one marked by progressively increasing loudness.
crescendo-decrescendo murmur
one with increasing intensity until mid- to late systole, then a decreasing intensity, giving a diamond-shaped tracing on phonocardiography. Characteristic of pulmonary stenosis.
decrescendo murmur
one with an intensity that gradually decreases. Heard during diastole in aortic or pulmonary valvular insufficiency.
diamond-shaped murmur
refers to the phonocardiographic tracing of a crescendo-decrescendo murmur.
diastolic murmur
one at diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonary regurgitation.
ejection murmur
systolic murmur heard predominantly in mid-systole, when ejection volume and velocity of blood flow are at their maximum.
friction murmur
friction rub.
functional murmur
a cardiac murmur occurring in the absence of structural changes in the heart.
heart murmur
any adventitious sound heard over the region of the heart. It may indicate a leaking or stenotic valve, a congenital patency between the right and left sides of the heart, or be a functional murmur which does not indicate cardiac disease. These occur in young foals, some of them disappear before maturity.
hemic murmur
see blood murmur (above).
innocent murmur
one caused by increased velocity of blood rather than a cardiac lesion.
machinery murmur, machinery-like murmur
a long, rumbling sound occupying most of systole and diastole. Characteristic of patent ductus arteriosus and arteriovenous fistulas.
mitral murmur
one due to disease of the mitral valve.
musical murmur
a cardiac murmur having a periodic harmonic pattern.
organic murmur
one due to structural change in the heart.
pansystolic murmur
one heard throughout systole.
prediastolic murmur
one occurring just before and with diastole, due to mitral obstruction or to aortic or pulmonary regurgitation.
presystolic murmur
one occurring shortly before the onset of ventricular ejection, usually associated with a narrowed atrioventricular valve.
pulmonary murmur
one due to disease of the valves of the pulmonary artery.
radiating heart murmur
one which is heard over a wider area or over another area. The systolic murmur of subaortic stenosis radiates up the aortic arch and carotid arteries. It can be heard over the right, as well as left, heart base and occasionally over the head.
regurgitant murmur
one due to a dilated valvular orifice, with consequent regurgitation of blood through the valve.
seagull murmur
a raucous murmur resembling the call of a seagull, frequently heard in aortic insufficiency.
systolic murmur
one occurring at systole, usually due to mitral or tricuspid regurgitation, or to aortic or pulmonary obstruction.
tricuspid murmur
one caused by disease of the tricuspid valve.
vascular murmur
one heard over a blood vessel.
vesicular murmur
the normal breath sounds heard over the lungs.

Patient discussion about murmur

Q. What is a Heart Murmur? My friend told me that some people have a heart murmor and it is normal. Is that possible? What is a heart murmur?

A. A heart murmur is a sound that is created by inadequate blood flow through the heart and its large vessels, for example the aorta. Some are born with a heart murmur and further testing doesn't reveal any significant problem. This is called a physiological murmur.
http://www.5min.com/Video/What-is-Innocent-Heart-Murmur-5501

Q. How are Heart Murmurs Classified? What are the characteristics of different heart murmurs?

A. Heart murmurs are charachterized by their location, their strength, their timing, whether or not they radiate and so on. For example, this is a sound of a heart murmur compatible with a disease called aortic stenosis-
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/medther/Cardiology/audio/as.wav
Notice that the murmur begin with the heart sound and lasts all through the beat.

More discussions about murmur