diastolic blood pressure


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diastolic blood pressure

the minimum level of blood pressure measured between contractions of the heart. It may vary with age, gender, body weight, emotional state, and other factors.

di·as·to·lic blood pres·sure

(dī'ă-stol'ik blŭd presh'ŭr)
Intracardiac pressure during or due to diastolic relaxation in a cardiac chamber.

Diastolic blood pressure

Blood pressure when the heart is resting between beats.
Mentioned in: Hypertension

pressure

force per unit area exerted by a gas/liquid against the walls of its container, or a solid (e.g. foot) against the contact/support surface
  • blood pressure; BP pressure/tension of arterial blood, maintained by ventricular contraction, arteriolar and capillary resistance, arterial wall elasticity and circulating blood viscosity and volume; recorded (using sphygmomanometer and stethoscope or automated blood pressure recorder) by occluding the brachial artery at heart level; as cuff pressure is reduced, blood flow gradually restores; systolic and diastolic BP are noted (Korotkoff's sounds) in mmHg, and expressed as a ratio (systolic/diastolic); normal adult BP = 120/80mmHg; BP is often raised in older people and in diabetes (see antihypertensive agents; hypertension)

  • diastolic BP lowest value (in mmHg) of recorded BP and minimum pressure at which the arterial system operates; occurs at the point of heart muscle relaxation; noted as the last audible arterial bruit (when impedance to blood flow [imposed by the deflating sphygmomanometer cuff] has fully reduced), and arterial blood flow is no longer restricted, and therefore silent; see pressure, systolic BP

  • partial pressure pressure exerted by a gas in a liquid, e.g. pressure of oxygen in blood (P O2); see pulse oximeter

  • systolic BP highest value (in mmHg) of recorded BP and maximum pressure at which the arterial system operates; occurs at the point of heart muscle contraction; noted as the first audible arterial bruit (when impedance to blood flow [imposed by the fully inflated sphygmomanometer cuff] has reduced [following opening of the pressure valve screw]) and arterial flow can just occur, at maximal cardiac contraction

References in periodicals archive ?
The primary analyses of testing for mean differences over time for systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different for the control group.
Based on third hypothesis "significant relationship exists between two methods of recovery on Jacuzzi recovery and mild swimming recovery on diastolic blood pressure" and due to reject of this hypothesis it can be concluded that there was not significant relationship exists between two methods of recovery on Jacuzzi recovery and mild swimming recovery on diastolic blood pressure.
6% (13 boys and 23 girls) had diastolic blood pressure equal to or greater than 91 mmHg.
Low-Dose Docosahexaenoic Acid Lowers Diastolic Blood Pressure in Middle-Aged Men and Women," J.
Americans may have heard that diastolic blood pressure counts more.
Editor's Note: A decrease in diastolic blood pressure of 0.
The authors conclude that serum concentrations of PCBs, especially those congeners with multiple ortho chlorines, are strongly associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.
A recent study published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming about two cups of 100 percent orange juice every day for one month significantly lowered diastolic blood pressure among men who were slightly overweight, but otherwise healthy.
Group average diastolic blood pressure as lower by 1.
5 times more likely to have a diastolic blood pressure at or above the 90th percentile than were children in the lowest tertile after the investigators controlled for race, gender, maternal education, and body mass index z score, Dr.
In addition, the effect on diastolic blood pressure was favorable in the alcohol-free group, whereas alcohol consumption prevented the lowering of diastolic blood pressure levels.
During exposure to polluted air, volunteers' diastolic blood pressure, or low-pressure number, rose an average of about 6 millimeters of pressure, or 9 percent, Urch and his colleagues found.