diaschisis


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di·as·chi·sis

(dī-as'ki-sis),
A sudden inhibition of function produced by an acute focal disturbance in a portion of the brain at a distance from the original site of injury, but anatomically connected with it through fiber tracts.
[G. a splitting]

diaschisis

/di·as·chi·sis/ (di-as´kĭ-sis) loss of function and electrical activity due to cerebral lesions in areas remote from the lesion but neuronally connected to it.

di·as·chi·sis

(dī-as'ki-sis)
A sudden inhibition of function produced by an acute focal disturbance in a portion of the brain at a distance from the original seat of injury, but anatomically connected with it through fiber tracts.
[G. a splitting]

diaschisis

loss of function and electrical activity in an area of the brain due to a lesion in a remote area that is neuronally connected with it.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, we must also remember that the acquired injury to one hemisphere can create disruptions in the functionining of the other hemisphere due to diaschisis (dysfunction due to lack of normal afferent impulses), metabolic disturbance, or edema.
The postulated mechanism of action is through reversing GABA-mediated diaschisis in the brain.
Feeney D: Pharmacologic modulation of recovery after brain injury: A reconsideration of diaschisis.
The hypothesis of cross cerebellar-cerebral diaschisis was proposed in 1987, after which growing interest in this subject was seen (5).
The first is the diaschisis, which was proposed appreciably by the aforementioned groups: alterations in cortical blood circulation secondary to reduction of the excitatory impulses may give rise to impairment in high cortical functions.
Thus, the diaschisis mechanism in thalamic aphasias appears to be valid once again.
In the long haul, it doesn't really matter if diaschisis or denervation supersensitivity is at play, but whether or not persons with brain injury can learn to feed themselves and thus enhance their independence and quality of life.